What’s the difference between a proxy and a VPN and why is one security stronger than the other? Which security feature is stronger and why?

Proxy vs VPN

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What’s the difference between a proxy and a VPN, and why is one security stronger than the other? Which security feature is stronger and why?

When it comes to online security, there are a number of different factors to consider. Two of the most popular methods for protecting your identity and data are proxy servers and VPNs. Both proxy servers and VPNs can help to mask your IP address and encrypt your traffic, but there are some key differences between the two. One major difference is that proxy servers only encrypt traffic going through the server, while VPNs encrypt all traffic from your device. This means that proxy servers are only effective if you’re using specific apps or visiting specific websites. VPNs, on the other hand, provide a more comprehensive solution as they can encrypt all traffic from your device, no matter where you’re accessing the internet from. Another key difference is that proxy servers tend to be less expensive than VPNs, but they also offer less privacy and security. When it comes to online security, proxy servers and VPNs both have their pros and cons. It’s important to weigh these factors carefully before decide which option is right for you.

VPN is virtual private network connects your incoming traffic and outgoing traffic to another network.

A proxy just relays your internet traffic. To websites you visit, your IP appears to be that of the proxy server.

A VPN is a type of proxy for which all the communication between your computer and the proxy server is encrypted. With a VPN, no one snooping your internet connection (e.g., your ISP) can see what websites you are visiting or what you are doing there. Security is much better.

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VPN PROS:

What is a Proxy Server?

A proxy server is a computer system that performs as an intermediary in the request made by users. This type of server helps prevent an attacker from attacking the network and serves as a tool used to create a firewall.

The etymology of the word proxy means “a figure that can be used to represent the value of something”, this means that a proxy server represents or acts on behalf of the user. The fundamental purpose of proxy servers is to safeguard the direct connection of internet users and resources.


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All requests made by the users from the internet go to the proxy server. The responses of the request return back to the proxy server for evaluation and then to the user. Proxy servers serve as an intermediary between the local network and the world wide web. Proxy servers are used for several reasons, such as to filter web content, to avert restrictions like parental blocks, to screen downloads and uploads, and to provide privacy when browsing the internet. The proxy server also prevents and protects the identity of the users.

There are different types of proxy servers used according to the different purposes of a request made by the clients and users. Proxies provide a valuable layer of security for your network and computers. It can be set up as web filters or firewalls which can protect computers from threats such as malware or ransomware. This extra security is also significant when linked with a secured gateway or attached security products. This way, network administrators can filter traffic according to its level of safety or traffic consumption of the network.

Are Proxies and VPNs the same?

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Proxies are not the same as VPNs. The only similarity between Proxies and VPNs is that they both connect you to the internet via an intermediary server. An online proxy forwards your traffic to its destination, while a VPN, on the other hand, encrypts all traffic between the VPN server and your device. Here are some more differences between proxies and VPNs:

  • VPNs help you encrypt your traffic while proxy servers don’t do that.
  • Proxies don’t protect you from government surveillance, ISP tracking, and hackers, which is why they are never used to handle sensitive information. VPN protects you from the same.
  • VPNs function on the operating system level while proxies work on the application level.
  • Proxies only reroute the traffic of a specific app or browser while VPNs reroute it through a VPN server.
  • Since VPNs need to encrypt your sensitive data, they can be slower than proxies.
  • Most proxy servers are free while most VPNs are paid. Don’t trust free VPN services as they can compromise your data.
  • A VPN connection is found to be more reliable than proxy server connections that can drop more frequently.

Why Is a VPN Considered to be More Secure Than a Proxy Server?

By now, you might have already noticed the reason since we have discussed it. The question is: Is a VPN better than a proxy? The simple answer is “Yes.”

How? A VPN provides privacy and security by routing your traffic through a secure VPN server and encrypting your traffic while a proxy, on the other hand, simply passes that traffic through a mediating server. It doesn’t necessarily offer any extra protection unless you use some extra features.

Proxy PROS:

However, when the motivation is to avoid geo-blocking, a proxy is more likely to be successful. Websites that need to do geo-blocking can normally tell that your IP is that of a VPN server. They don’t account for all the possible proxy servers.

But the problem here is they use datacenter IP (the server IP),

Also VPNs save logs and save EVERYTHING you do.

In the other hand, there are many types of proxy: datacenter proxy (worst one), Residential proxy, Mobile proxy 4G, and Mobile Proxy 5G.

If you use residential proxy or mobile proxy it might be much better and safer for many reasons:

  1. Residential IP means that the Proxy use a regular ISP like comcast, Charter, Sprint, etc.
  2. They don’t save logs.
  3. The connection is not even direct, it goes to their server first and then to a a real device in another place.
  4. Websites like facebook and shopping sites won’t block you, because you use residential or mobile proxy, so they won’t know that you use a proxy to hide your real IP, while VPN will be easily detected.

Now people would say that the problem with socks5 residential and mobile proxy is the cost, because most of websites sells it on very expensive price.

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I use a good cheap and very high quality socks5 residential proxy costs only 3 USD a month per dedicated residential proxy, and the traffic is unlimited.

And it is very fast because it is dedicated and also virgin with fraud score 0.

The website name is Liber8Proxy.com

Moreover socks5 residential proxy uses socks5 connection port with promixitron so it would cover your entire PC traffic.

Also their customers support are nice and they always online.

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How to Protect Yourself from Man-in-the-Middle Attacks: Tips for Safer Communication

Man in the middle attacks

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How to Protect Yourself from Man-in-the-Middle Attacks: Tips for Safer Communication

Man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks are a type of cyberattack where a malicious actor intercepts communications between two parties in order to secretly access sensitive data or inject false information. While MITM attacks can be difficult to detect, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself.

For example, always verifying the identity of the person you’re communicating with and using encrypted communication tools whenever possible. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of common signs that an attack may be happening, such as unexpected messages or requests for sensitive information.

Man-in-the-middle attacks are one of the most common types of cyberattacks. MITM attacks can allow the attacker to gain access to sensitive information, such as passwords or financial data. Man-in-the-middle attacks can be very difficult to detect, but there are some steps you can take to protect yourself. First, be aware of the warning signs of a man-in-the-middle attack. These include:

– unexpected changes in login pages,

– unexpected requests for personal information,

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– and unusual account activity.

If you see any of these warning signs, do not enter any sensitive information and contact the company or individual involved immediately. Second, use strong security measures, such as two-factor authentication, to protect your accounts. This will make it more difficult for attackers to gain access to your information. Finally, keep your software and operating system up to date with the latest security patches. This will help to close any potential vulnerabilities that could be exploited by attackers.

Man-in-the-middle attacks can be devastating for individuals and businesses alike. By intercepting communications between two parties, attackers can gain access to sensitive information or even impersonate one of the parties involved. Fortunately, there are a number of steps you can take to protect yourself from man-in-the-middle attacks.


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  • First, avoid using public Wi-Fi networks for sensitive transactions. Attackers can easily set up their own rogue networks, and it can be difficult to tell the difference between a legitimate network and a malicious one. If you must use public Wi-Fi, be sure to use a VPN to encrypt your traffic.
  • Second, be cautious about the links you click on. When in doubt, hover over a link to see where it will actually take you. And always be suspicious of links that come from untrustworthy sources.
  • Finally, keep your software and security tools up to date. Man-in-the-middle attacks are constantly evolving, so it’s important to have the latest defenses in place.

By following these simple tips, you can help keep yourself safe from man-in-the-middle attacks.

Read more here

Is MITM attack possible when on HTTPS?

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HTTPS (or really, SSL) is specifically designed to thwart MITM attacks.

Web browsers validate that both the certificate presented by the server is labeled correctly with the website’s domain name and that it has a chain of trust back to a well-known certificate authority. Under normal circumstances, this is enough to prevent anyone from impersonating the website.

As the question points out, you can thwart this by somehow acquiring the secret key for the existing website’s certificate.

You can also launch a MITM attack by getting one of the well-known certificate authorities to issue you a certificate with the domain name of the website you wish to impersonate. This can be (and has been) accomplished by social engineering and hacking into the registrars.

Outside of those two main methods, you would have to rely upon bugs in the SSL protocol or its implementations (of which a few have been discovered over the years).

What are the countermeasures of MITM?

1- Certificates.

For the web, we use a similar principle. A certificate is a specific document issued by a third party that validate the identity of a website. Your PC can ask the third party if the certificate is correct, and only if it is allow the traffic. This is what HTTPs does.

2- Simple…encryption!

Man In The Middle attacks are carried out because an attacker is in between both communicators (let’s say two clients or a client and a server). If he is able to see the communication in clear text, he can do a whole lot ranging from stealing login credentials to snooping on conversations. If encryption is implemented, the attacker would see gibberish and “un-understandable” text instead.

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In terms of web communication, digital certificates would do a great job of encrypting communication stream (any website using HTTPS encrypts communication stream by default). For social media apps like whats app and Skype, it is the responsibility of the vendor to implement encryption.

MitM Attack Techniques and Types

  • ARP Cache Poisoning. Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a low-level process that translates the machine address (MAC) to the IP address on the local network. …
  • DNS Cache Poisoning. …
  • Wi-Fi Eavesdropping. …
  • Session Hijacking.
  • IP Spoofing
  • DNS Spoofing
  • HTTPS Spoofing
  • SSL Hijacking
  • Email Hijacking
  • Wifi Eavesdropping
  • Cookie Stealing and so on.

Can MITM attacks steal credit card information?

When you enter your sensitive information on an HTTP website and press that “Send” button, all your private details travel in plain text from your web browser to the destination server.

A cyber-attacker can employ a man-in-the-middle attack and intercept your information. Since it’s not encrypted, the hacker can see everything: your name, physical address, card numbers, and anything else you entered.

To avoid MITM attacks, don’t share your info on HTTP sites. More on SSL certificates and man-in-the-middle attacks in this detailed medium article

How common are MITM attacks in public places with free WIFI?

Not common by people, but common by malware and other software that are designed to do that.

How do you ensure your RDP is secure from MITM attacks?

  • Make sure all of your workstations and remote servers are patched.
  • On highly sensitive devices, use two-factor authentication.
  • Reduce the number of remote account users with elevated privileges on the server.
  • Make a safe password.
  • Your credentials should not be saved in your RDP register.
  • Remove the RDP file from your computer.

How do we know that the Top 3 Voice Recognition Devices like Siri Alexa and Ok Google are not spying on us?

Proxy vs VPN

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How do we know that the Top 3 Voice Recognition Devices like Siri Alexa and Ok Google are not spying on us?

When you ask Siri a question, she gives you an answer. But have you ever stopped to wonder how she knows the answer? After all, she’s just a computer program, right? Well, actually, Siri is powered by artificial intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML). This means that she constantly learning and getting better at understanding human speech. So when you ask her a question, she uses her ML algorithms to figure out what you’re saying and then provides you with an answer.

So, How do we know that the Top 3 Voice Recognition Devices like Siri Alexa and Ok Google are not spying on us?

The Amazon Echo is a voice-activated speaker powered by Amazon’s AI assistant, Alexa. Echo uses far-field voice recognition to hear you from across the room, even while music is playing. Once it hears the wake word “Alexa,” it streams audio to the cloud, where the Alexa Voice Service turns the speech into text. Machine learning algorithms then analyze this text to try to understand what you want.

But what does this have to do with spying? Well, it turns out that ML can also be used to eavesdrop on people’s conversations. This is why many people are concerned about their privacy when using voice-activated assistants like Siri, Alexa, and Ok Google. However, there are a few things that you can do to protect your privacy. For example, you can disable voice recognition on your devices or only use them when you’re in a private location. You can also be careful about what information you share with voice-activated assistants. So while they may not be perfect, there are ways that you can minimize the risk of them spying on you.

Some applications which have background components, such as Facebook, do send ambient sounds to their data centers for processing. In so doing, they collect information on what you are talking about, and use it to target advertising.

Siri, Google, and Alexa only do this to decide whether or not you’ve invoked the activation trigger. For Apple hardware, recognition of “Siri, …” happens in hardware locally, without sending out data for recognition. The same for “Alexa, …” for Alexa hardware, and “Hey, Google, …” for Google hardware.

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Things get more complicated for these three things, when they are installed cross-platform. So, for example, to make “Hey, Google, …” work on non-Google hardware, where it’s not possible to do the recognition locally, yes, it listens. But unlike Facebook, it’s not recording ambient to collect keywords.

Practically, it’s my understanding that the tree major brands don’t, and it’s only things like Facebook which more or less “violate your trust like this. And other than Facebook, I’m uncertain whether or not any other App does this.

You’ll find that most of the terms and conditions you’ve agreed to on installation of a third party App, grant them pretty broad discretion.


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Personally, I tend to not install Apps like that, and use the WebUI from the mobile device browser instead.

If you do that, instead of installing an App, you rob them of their power to eavesdrop effectively. Source: Terry Lambert

How do we know that the Top 3 Voice Recognition Devices like Siri Alexa and Ok Google are not spying on us?

Conclusion:

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Machine learning is a field of artificial intelligence (AI) concerned with the design and development of algorithms that learn from data. Machine learning algorithms have been used for a variety of tasks, including voice recognition, image classification, and spam detection. In recent years, there has been growing concern about the use of machine learning for surveillance and spying. However, it is important to note that machine learning is not necessarily synonymous with spying. Machine learning algorithms can be used for good or ill, depending on how they are designed and deployed. When it comes to voice-activated assistants such as Siri, Alexa, and OK Google, the primary concern is privacy. These assistants are constantly listening for their wake words, which means they may be recording private conversations without the user’s knowledge or consent. While it is possible that these recordings could be used for nefarious purposes, it is also important to remember that machine learning algorithms are not perfect. There is always the possibility that recordings could be misclassified or misinterpreted. As such, it is important to weigh the risks and benefits of using voice-activated assistants before making a decision about whether or not to use them.

How Microsoft’s Cortana Stacks Up Against Siri and Alexa in Terms of Intelligence?

How do we know that the Top 3 Voice Recognition Devices like Siri Alexa and Ok Google are not spying on us?
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CyberSecurity – What are some things that get a bad rap, but are actually quite secure?

Proxy vs VPN

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CyberSecurity - What are some things that get a bad rap, but are actually quite secure?

CyberSecurity – What are some things that get a bad rap, but are actually quite secure?

Cybersecurity is an important issue for everyone, from individuals to large organizations. There are many things that get a bad rap when it comes to cybersecurity, but that doesn’t mean they’re not secure. For example, PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) is a method of encrypting emails that is considered to be very secure. However, it can be difficult to set up and use. Another example is using very long passwords that are actually a sentence. This may seem like a security risk, but it’s actually more secure than a shorter password because it’s more difficult for hackers to guess. Additionally, changing the default port for certain services like databases can help to prevent hacking. Unplugging the ethernet cable may also seem like a security risk, but it’s actually one of the most effective ways to prevent data breaches. Finally, browser password managers are often considered to be insecure, but they’re actually quite secure if used properly. Cybersecurity is an important issue, and there are many things that can be done to help prevent hacking and data breaches.

There are a lot of CyberSecurity myths out there. People think that X, Y, and Z are the most secure way to do things when in reality, they are the least secure. The biggest myth is that PGP is unbreakable. PGP has been broken many times and is not a reliable form of CyberSecurity. Another myth is that very long passwords are secure. The problem with very long passwords is that they are difficult to remember and often get written down somewhere. If a hacker gets ahold of your password, they can easily access your account. The best way to prevent CyberSecurity breaches is to use MFA, OAuth, and two-step verification whenever possible. These methods make it much more difficult for hackers to gain access to your accounts. While they may not be foolproof, they are the best CyberSecurity measure available.

1- PGP

PGP is a Form of Minimalism

As a protocol, PGP is surprising simple. Here is what happens if you want to use it to securely send a message to someone:

  1. You get from them a PGP identity (public key). How you do that is entirely up to you.
  2. Your PGP program uses that identity to perform a single public key encryption of a message key.
  3. Then the message key is used to encrypt the message which is added to the encrypted message key to make the encrypted message.
  4. Your correspondent does the opposite operations to get the message.

If you want to sign your message then you:

  1. Hash the message.
  2. Do a public key signature operation on the hash and attach the result to the message.
  3. Your correspondent checks the signature from your PGP identity, which they have acquired somehow.

The simple key handling is where the minimalism comes from. It is why PGP can be used in so many non-email contexts.

As a contrast, consider the Signal Protocol for instant messaging. I will not attempt to describe Signal in any detail as I would get parts of it wrong. It would also make for a pointlessly long article. There is a high level description of the Signal protocol here. None of the following comments are intended to be critical, they are intended to give an idea of the level of complexity of the protocol in total:

  • Signal has at least 2 systems for creating forward secrecy. Each system requires a system to deal with loss of synchronization.
  • A Signal session requires the storage and maintenance of a lot of state information.
  • Signal normally uses a server based “prekey” system to deal with the case where a client is offline and thus is unable to negotiate.
  • Signal achieves partial deniability with a triple Diffie-Hellman key exchange. OpenPGP achieves complete deniability by not signing the message in the first place.
  • Supporting the Signal protocol in practice requires a separate system to store and protect past messages1). Since this is at odds with forward secrecy such a system will end up with a system to delete old messages.

The Signal Protocol is built on ideas from the Off the Record (OTR) protocol. Interestingly enough, OTR was intended to improve PGP by adding extra functionality. Signal adds functionality on top of the OTR functionality. So Signal could be considered the result of an attempt to improve something by making it more complex.

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I believe that reliability and security are best achieved with simple systems. OpenPGP is a standard that describes such a system.

2- Very long passwords that are actually a sentence

It could be bad if you just came up with it and forget it, and people think it’s bad if it only has lowercase and no numbers or punctuation. But a 5-6 word sentence could be quite secure, especially if it’s a bit weird. “Lemons make a delicious snack in my house.”

3- Writing passwords down.

I tell all my old relatives to write their passwords down in a little notebook. As long as there isn’t someone there regularly I don’t trust, it is much better than using same password and if their physical security at their house is compromised, there are bigger concerns than a notebook of banking passwords.


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We write down all the passwords to our most secure systems – but then we rip them in half and put them in 2 separate safes.

Did I say passwords? I meant encryption keys.

4- Changing default ports for certain services like dbs

Most of the gangs out there use tools that don’t do a full search, so they go through the default port list

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5- MFA in general.

Takes 60 seconds to set up, and an additional 5s each time you use it, but can save you hours if not days of manual recovery efforts with support to regain access to a compromised account. Yet people don’t like the idea.

If you are using TOTP for your MFA, you can even put it right in the browser with a plug-in. I use this approach for work. It’s very convenient.

If you use a password manager that supports TOTP and auto type (e.g. KeePassXC) then you don’t even need to mess with it once you have it set up.

6- Oauth for 3rd party apps.

Those “sign into our app with your (Google, Microsoft, etc) account” things. As long as you trust the ID provider and the app, it’s usually secure. More so, considering it prevents password reuse, and you aren’t exposed if any of those 3rd party apps have a breach.

7- Two-step verification.

Yes it’s annoying to need two devices every time you want to log into your most precious accounts, but trust me, I’d rather take the extra 10 seconds to authorize a login than go through the hell of having my account breached.

8-Biometric Authentication.

The argument is that ‘you can’t change your face/finger’ but it is actually more secure than other ‘magic link’ providers.

Let me be clear, there are some providers that are still iffy on security. But there are also some that have device native authentication (you need the device to auth), they don’t store passwords or password hashes, and only has public keys.

One example of this is https://passage.id/ which is about as secure as you can get.

9- Zoom.

Yes, they had a bunch of issues at the start, but they fixed them. I would much rather work with a company that had security assessments and fixed the problems rather than a company which has never been assessed.

10- Unplugging the ethernet cable.

11- Browser password managers?

Rant moment: reasons cybersecurity fails

<Rant>

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People don’t see value of putting effort in cybersecurity because they don’t see any material gains from it. The best thing they can see is nothing bad happening.

No news isn’t good enough of a good news. This is enough to mostly ignore all cybersecurity advice altogether.

This is similar to people not taking care of themselves health-wise, because the best things they can see is not getting sick.

</Rant>

Why do cyber attackers commonly use social engineering attacks?

Hackers commonly use social engineering attacks because they can be very effective. By using social engineering, hackers can take advantage of people’s trusting nature and willingness to help others. They can also exploit the fact that people are often not well-informed about security and privacy issues. For example, a hacker might pose as a customer service representative and ask for someone’s password. Or, they might send an email that looks like it is from a trusted source, such as a bank or government agency, and ask the recipient to click on a link or download an attachment. If the person falls for the deception, the hacker can gain access to their accounts or infect their computer with malware. That is why it is important to be aware of these types of attacks and know how to protect yourself.

Cyber attackers commonly use social engineering attacks for a number of reasons. First, hacking into a person’s or organization’s computer systems is becoming increasingly difficult as security measures become more sophisticated. Second, even if a hacker is able to gain access to a system, they are likely to be discovered and caught before they can do any significant damage. Third, social engineering attacks allow hackers to bypass security measures and obtain sensitive information without being detected. Finally, social media platforms have made it easier for cyber attackers to obtain personal information about their targets and to carry out attacks. As a result, social engineering attacks are an attractive option for many cyber attackers.

To conclude:

Cybersecurity is often thought of as a complex and technical field, but there are actually many simple things that everyone can do to help stay safe online. For example, one way to protect your online communications is to use PGP encryption. This type of encryption is incredibly difficult for even the most skilled hacker to break, but it’s also easy to use. Another way to improve your cybersecurity is to use very long passwords that are actually a sentence. This may seem daunting, but using a phrase as your password makes it much harder for hackers to guess. Additionally, changing the default ports for certain services can help prevent unauthorized access. And finally, unplugging the ethernet cable when you’re not using it is a great way to physically block hackers from accessing your device. By following these simple tips, you can dramatically improve your cybersecurity and protect your privacy.

source: r/cybersecurity

Source: r/cybersecurity

  • Onboarding SIEM solutions Best and Worst
    by /u/AverageAdmin (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 9:00 pm

    What’s your best and worst experiences onboarding a SIEM solution for a client? submitted by /u/AverageAdmin [link] [comments]

  • What were the best cybersecurity courses you ever had?
    by /u/athanielx (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 8:43 pm

    I periodically look for various information about new training courses or educational material. I've been in cybersecurity for many years, but I'm still curious about what's on the market now. I worked as a SOC Engineer-Analyst, then moved to SecOps and this training material had a high impact on me and my career: networkdefense.io: Investigation theory Practical threat hunting Also, Network Security Monitoring book by Chris Sanders Active Countermeasures: Practical Network Threat Hunting Antisyphon: SOC core skills Offensive Countermeasures book by John Strand submitted by /u/athanielx [link] [comments]

  • Discussion Thread: Enterprise Passkeys
    by /u/bespoke_redditor (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 7:45 pm

    Are companies adopting passkeys for work settings and what is your personal take on this mess? ​ From my perspective FIDO let the floodgates open too soon which led ecosystems (apple, google, and microsoft) to make their own custom flavor and UI that doesn't interact well in a enterprise setting. I'll give it a thumbs up so far for consumers now that it's safe, syncable and recoverable now but I'd like to hear more from fellow redditors. Especially if your organization has tried to adopt passkeys but come across blockers or even success stories. submitted by /u/bespoke_redditor [link] [comments]

  • Code Scanning - best practices for working with eng teams
    by /u/Hoselam-sar-rafteh (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 7:28 pm

    How do you use source code analysis tools in your company? Do you use separate products for SAST, IaC, Secrets Scanning? How do you deal with false positives? What would you wish was different (tools, workflows, eng teams collaboration, etc.) I'm on the engineering side, but am interested in rolling out a code analysis tool for our team. We don't have a dedicated AppSec team yet. What are the chances that we (as an eng team) can run any of the code scanner tools on our own? I'd appreciate your ideas! submitted by /u/Hoselam-sar-rafteh [link] [comments]

  • Malwares as a plural
    by /u/rootxploit (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 7:26 pm

    I’ve been dumbfounded by the rise of “malwares” as a plural to malware. Obviously malware is a portmanteau of malicious and software, and the plural of software is software. At first I just thought it was some people being wrong and they’d learn. But is this becoming a new normal? Like how cracker technically means malicious and hacker does not but everyone just uses hacker instead. submitted by /u/rootxploit [link] [comments]

  • Multiple botnets exploiting one-year-old TP-Link flaw to hack routers
    by /u/CYRISMA_Buddy (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 5:54 pm

    submitted by /u/CYRISMA_Buddy [link] [comments]

  • Cerebral to pay $7 million settlement in Facebook pixel data leak case
    by /u/CYRISMA_Buddy (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 5:53 pm

    submitted by /u/CYRISMA_Buddy [link] [comments]

  • How does KnowBe4 spoof the company domain?
    by /u/AppearanceAgile2575 (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 5:52 pm

    Is there anything I can do to make it so they, and attackers by extension, wouldn’t be able to do this? submitted by /u/AppearanceAgile2575 [link] [comments]

  • Attackers exploiting new critical OpenMetadata vulnerabilities on Kubernetes clusters
    by /u/SCI_Rusher (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 5:34 pm

    submitted by /u/SCI_Rusher [link] [comments]

  • Survey on Phishing/Phishing Attacks
    by /u/Black_Space5000 (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 5:08 pm

    Hello all, here is a survey that I need responses for, for a college course in technical and report writing. The assignment related to this survey has to be related to whatever we are majoring in, and I am major in cyber security. So this survey is on the subject of phishing. The survey consists of 10 questions mostly yes or no questions. Any responses will be greatly appreciated Link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VV755VN submitted by /u/Black_Space5000 [link] [comments]

  • Malicious cyber activity spiking in Philippines, analysts say
    by /u/TheRecord_Media (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 4:57 pm

    submitted by /u/TheRecord_Media [link] [comments]

  • Trust but Verify approach
    by /u/techaspirant (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 4:54 pm

    I have a feeling the answer to this is going to be "depends on the company" as is always the case, but I thought I'd gather input anyway. I'm curious to know how common it is for an infosec/secops team to be auditing/verifying changes to infrastructure themselves. With the recent palo-alto vuln for example, we talked to the team that manages those devices about whether or not we're vulnerable. They checked and said we are not... and I figured that's good enough for us. But my boss said we need to be verifying patch levels and exposure ourselves. Now to be clear, I don't think my boss is just being randomly mistrustful. Other teams we work with (granted w/more complex systems like fleets of linux hosts) have told us before some change or other was made to close vulnerabilities that weren't in fact done. But a lot of those types of systems are also easier to verify (due to agents or cloud-based tools that just require a glance at a dashboard for verification). It seems to me that having to log into production devices to double-check what the responsible team said is true is not only extra work but kinda showing an extra level of mistrust + taking responsibility for something that we don't need to. (i.e. if something bad did happen and it's because that team said they were on version X but weren't really, is it really the infosec teams fault?) The need for production access to all our firewalls/LBs/etc. also seems a bit concerning, though obviously we only need read-only, but I'm new enough to this field I just want to better understand typical best practices. Anyhow, just curious to know what people think. submitted by /u/techaspirant [link] [comments]

  • What Are Some Things To Include For Effective Report Writing?
    by /u/squidJG (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 4:10 pm

    Exactly as the title says. One of my higher-ups tasked me to look into a recent vulnerability that could affect our org. I have all the information I need to write the report so that's all set. This would be my first time writing an attestation to present to 3rd parties, C-suite, etc., even though I've written reports in the past. Those reports were performing research on existing security tools/products to introduce into our environment. Since this is a new endeavor for me, what are some things that I should look out for? I understand that bias should be kept out of report due to how dangerous it could be, and also to be clear and concise in my writings so there isn't any room for misinterpretation. I'm more concerned about structuring the report in a way that readers/listeners can follow along without difficulty. Any help is appreciated, I have about a week to get this completed but the sooner the better(thank god). Love this sub, thank you guys. submitted by /u/squidJG [link] [comments]

  • Need a solid Project Sugg.
    by /u/eoverthink (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 2:38 pm

    With all these YouTube videos I’m getting option fatigue. I’m about to finish up with my WGU degree and feel like the labs they give you are cool but put in the real world I don’t think they translate much. I still feel as much as a newbie as I did when I started school Aug 2022. And youtube has so many fluff tutorials that it’s hard to finish one that’ll really help gain that hands on experience Suggestions? submitted by /u/eoverthink [link] [comments]

  • Learning a new Query Language
    by /u/Munkky (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 2:03 pm

    Hello everyone, like many out there my company has many different software solutions that all like to use different query languages for their searches. I am attempting to find better ways of learning these different languages for myself and for teaching my coworkers. This is more of a "learning how to learn" question. I have thought about making standard naming convention charts (hostname is called x in this platform, y in this one), as well as other documents with "key" features used across platforms, stats/join/etc. I know that the main advice is just "do it more, get more hours in the platform" but I am also a believer in there being better ways that others have come up with other than brute force. The other issue is that while some languages like Splunk have a million tutorials, many solutions have just vendor documentation and nothing deeper outside of paid vendor stuff. How do you personally learn languages like this? submitted by /u/Munkky [link] [comments]

  • Prompt Injection 101. What do you think?
    by /u/nicomarcan (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 1:26 pm

    https://nico-autonoma.medium.com/beyond-the-prompt-a81fc9081091 submitted by /u/nicomarcan [link] [comments]

  • OPEN-SOURCE OR VERY LOW-COST CYBERSECURITY CONTROLS
    by /u/CyberGrizzly360 (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 12:13 pm

    Hello all, Thought to post here to see if any of you knew about any relevant info like open-source (or very low cost) security controls that can be used in place of the traditional big brands found in our everyday enterprise. Alternatively if you can point me in the right direction to someone or source that I can connect with to get such info. A dozen high-fives ladies and gentlemen for potential suggestions, comments, or tips. submitted by /u/CyberGrizzly360 [link] [comments]

  • Hacker claims to have leaked 85,981 customers of T2.
    by /u/RansomBook (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 11:02 am

    Every day we see more and more data breaches and it seems like the chances of experiencing a data breach, no matter who you are, is practically one. Why has it become so easy? Source: https://x.com/H4ckManac/status/1780547955381895172 submitted by /u/RansomBook [link] [comments]

  • Dark Web Monitoring Vulnerabilities
    by /u/ckarkui (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 5:19 am

    There are a lot of services that now claim to monitor the dark web for leaked information. I was recently looking at a Norton product and it involves inputting a lot of sensitive information such as address, drivers licence number, credit card number and so on. It got me thinking, could people be inadvertently putting themselves at risk by using these services? Firstly there's the integrity of the database which holds all this personal information to be used for crosschecking. Then there's the act of crosschecking also, so how can the client be sure that the information they provide remains secure in the process of these constant dark web checks? submitted by /u/ckarkui [link] [comments]

  • How important is your SIEM?
    by /u/Threezeley (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 4:16 am

    Obvious aspects aside like to satisfy regulatory compliance, and also putting cost aside as SIEMs can be quite expensive, how would you gauge how effective or useful your SIEM is compared to all other security/alerting tools in your organizations? The reason I ask is because my team manages a large SIEM in a very large organization. Because it's so large, duties are silo'd. A different team leverages the SIEM to create alerts which get fed into a SOAR product (managed by another team) before being presented to SOC. I am certain that other security tools are feeding alerts into the SOAR tool but I don't have any sense of that scope. We are so far removed from SOC that it really makes it difficult to assess the value of the work we do. Execs also don't seem to be very interested in improving processes or expanding capabilities, which makes me further question how important our SIEM is compared to the other security products in our landscape. Curious to hear perspectives of others. (I sometimes wish my role was broader so I could have a hand in the full chain, from identifying valuable data sources to ingest through to investigation/resolution.) submitted by /u/Threezeley [link] [comments]

  • Securely disposing of old IT equipment
    by /u/Adventurous-Dog-6158 (cybersecurity) on April 17, 2024 at 2:39 am

    If we want to dispose of a server, how can we ensure that any areas that may contain passwords or sensitive data (BIOS, etc) are sanitized/purged without physically shredding all electronic components? It’d be environmentally unfriendly to shred an entire motherboard, which would reduce its recyclability. I think some vendors my publish instructions but others may not, particularly for older equipment. Is there any reliable resource, even a paid one, that gathers this info? I understand that with some classifications of data, physical destruction is the only acceptable disposal method, but that does not apply to my industry. What do you folks normally do? Do you require that the disposal company shred SSDs/HDDs and all circuit boards? I did some research before and there's a lot of info on SSD/HDD disposal but I didn't see much about chips such as the BIOS. submitted by /u/Adventurous-Dog-6158 [link] [comments]

  • Palo Alto CVE-2024-3400 Mitigations Not Effective
    by /u/maceinjar (cybersecurity) on April 16, 2024 at 9:32 pm

    For those of you who previously applied mitigations (disabling telemetry), this was not effective. Devices may have still been exploited with mitigations in place. Content signatures updated to theoretically block newly discovered exploit paths. The only real fix is to put the hotfix, however these are not released yet for all affected versions. Details: https://security.paloaltonetworks.com/CVE-2024-3400 ​ submitted by /u/maceinjar [link] [comments]

  • Widely-Used PuTTY SSH Client Found Vulnerable to Key Recovery Attack
    by /u/DerBootsMann (cybersecurity) on April 16, 2024 at 9:16 pm

    submitted by /u/DerBootsMann [link] [comments]

  • Are forums still a thing?
    by /u/Standard-Art-1967 (cybersecurity) on April 16, 2024 at 4:20 pm

    I have heard that lot of hackers in the early 2000s learnt hacking from forums. Some met others from forums and stuffs like that? Are forums still a thing or are the sites like reddit, discord the new "forums"? submitted by /u/Standard-Art-1967 [link] [comments]

  • Microsoft is "ground zero" for foreign state-sponsored hackers and "It’s very difficult to defend against" a top Microsoft executive for security says
    by /u/B-HDR (cybersecurity) on April 16, 2024 at 7:44 am

    And that's why more and more countries are looking to Germany as 'a pilot project' which is seriously taking careful and steady steps to ditch Windows for Linux. submitted by /u/B-HDR [link] [comments]

  • Mentorship Monday - Post All Career, Education and Job questions here!
    by /u/AutoModerator (cybersecurity) on April 15, 2024 at 12:00 am

    This is the weekly thread for career and education questions and advice. There are no stupid questions; so, what do you want to know about certs/degrees, job requirements, and any other general cybersecurity career questions? Ask away! Interested in what other people are asking, or think your question has been asked before? Have a look through prior weeks of content - though we're working on making this more easily searchable for the future. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

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