Financial Independence and Legit Side Money Ideas For Techies and Geeks

Legit Side Money Ideas for Techies and Geeks

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Financial Independence and Legit Side Money Ideas For Techies and Geeks

Programmers, developers, software engineers, and other tech-savvy geeks are often some of the most financially independent people out there. That’s because they often have the skills to turn their side hustles into legit businesses that can generate significant income. In fact, many of the most successful tech entrepreneurs got their start by developing apps and selling them on popular app stores.

Football/Soccer World Cup 2022 Guide and Past World Cups History and Quiz illustrated

Financial Independence and Legit Side Money Ideas For Techies and Geeks

But you don’t need to be a whiz kid to make good money from your technical skills. Even if you’re not interested in starting your own company, there are plenty of opportunities to freelance or consult on projects that can pay well. And with the global economy increasingly reliant on technology, those skills are in high demand. So if you’re looking to boost your income, consider using your geeky talents to earn some extra cash. Who knows, you might just find yourself becoming a millionaire in the process.

This blog is about Clever Questions, Answers, Posts, discussions, links about:

If you’re a programmer, developer, software engineer, geek, or computer scientist, then you know that financial independence is important. After all, who wants to be tied down to a job they hate just because they need the money? The good news is that there are plenty of legitimate side money ideas out there for techies and geeks. Here are just a few:

  1. Programmers can make money by developing new apps and selling them on app stores like Apple’s App Store or Google Play.
  2. Developers can create websites or online courses teaching others how to code or use specific software programs.
  3. Software engineers can offer consulting services to companies who need help designing or improving their systems.
  4. Geeks can start a blog about their favorite topic (technology, science fiction, gaming, etc.) and make money through advertising or affiliate sales.
  5. Computer scientists can develop new algorithms or sell their existing ones to companies willing to pay for them.

So if you’re looking for ways to make some extra cash on the side, don’t despair – there are plenty of options out there for you. Do some research and see which one might be the best fit for your skills and interests. With a little effort, you could be well on your way to financial independence in no time!

Making money isn’t that big of a deal especially if a person is determined, The primary cause of poverty is ignorance and nothing else.

It stars with a burning desire to learn and your willingness to practice all you’ve learned and make the mistakes needed in other to get the a greater height, “that is how financial progression is achieved and sustained.”

in the aspect of making money online with a laptop, you can try out the following listed below….

  1. Affiliate Marketing.
  2. Selling on Amazon, eBay, Etsy, and Craigslist.
  3. Blogging.
  4. Niche E-commerce.
  5. Your Own YouTube Channel.
  6. Selling E-books.
  7. Develop Apps.
  8. Invest/trade cryptocurrency.

To be a master and be really successful in any of the listed, one has to first learn them before anything else goes.

And if you’re interested in cryptocurrency but too Busy and don’t have to time to learn, you can contact me I’ll teach you how a newbie trader can make profit in crypto quickly.

Legit Side Money Ideas on Quora

If you are looking for an all-in-one solution to help you prepare for the AWS Cloud Practitioner Certification Exam, look no further than this AWS Cloud Practitioner CCP CLFC01 book below.

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Thursday, December 01, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on December 1, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly Self-Promotion Thread - Wednesday, November 30, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 30, 2022 at 10:03 am

    Self-promotion (ie posting about projects/businesses that you operate and can profit from) is typically a practice that is discouraged in /r/financialindependence, and these posts are removed through moderation. This is a thread where those rules do not apply. However, please do not post referral links in this thread. Use this thread to talk about your blog, talk about your business, ask for feedback, etc. If the self-promotion starts to leak outside of this thread, we will once again return to a time where 100% of self-promotion posts are banned. Please use this space wisely. Link-only posts will be removed. Put some effort into it. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Wednesday, November 30, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 30, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Tuesday, November 29, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 29, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • 9.5 Years of Tracking – Career Break and $250k NW @ 30
    by /u/nifFIer (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 28, 2022 at 3:03 pm

    TL;DR: Supportive, loving spouses and a great therapist are the best. Would highly recommend. Edit for clarity: Yes, spouse is very happy I quit and is happier with his QOL after I quit. He'd been trying to get me to quit for over a year and is now quite pleased with himself for being proved right. We regularly go to couples therapy to keep tabs on things such as resentment and dissatisfaction. His current financial goal is to get me to spend more money on myself... Yes, he's crazy. (Link to previous post dated 9/28/2021) Updated information is bolded, the rest is copied from previous post Summary of Family: Self - BS/MS Civil Engineering and EI PE License, Structural Design ($72k Salary + Overtime) Funemployed/career break, college paid for by scholarships + parents, immigrant parents fled communism and poverty Spouse - BS Computer Science, Front-End Engineer ($82k salary) ($155k salary + RSUs/Bonuses), college paid for by scholarships and minimal loans, immigrated as a child to flee a different flavor of communism Dog – Puppy kindergarten, Dog (Kibble salary) We rent an apartment and drive cars that are “hand-me-downs” from our parents car got totaled in a car accident (other dude ran a red light), so now we're waiting for our new car to be delivered, hopefully by the end of the year... Income/NW/Spending Summary Tables + Self NW Charts Annual Summary Table link 2022 Spending Summary Table Self Investments Chart vs Contributions link Self NW Chart link Notes: For NW calculation purposes, joint assets are split 50/50 and added to each individual’s NW. Low "Gross Income - Self" in 2022 is due to quitting partway through the year. Drop in "Single Net Worth - Self" in 2022 is due to moving pre-marital cash into marital cash intentionally to increase cash buffer while I'm not working. Total wedding reception cost was about $22k for 100 people. 100% worth it. Growing Up and College/Grad School (2011-2018): (See Previous Post) Self Working Full-time: Salary History (COL Index: 90.8): $64k (2018) -> $65k (2019) -> $68k (2020) -> Switch Jobs, $70k (2020) -> $73k (2021) -> $86k (2022) -> Career break, $0k (Present) The differences between my salary and the income listed in the tables are due to overtime pay and performance bonuses. My first job was extremely stressful and required lots of overtime to meet deadlines. I had multiple panic attacks or crying sessions after work, it was hard to sleep, I had to deal with a toxic project manager, my anxiety and stress levels were through the roof. Even though I loved my boss, I ended up switching jobs (thanks to the support of my SO for enabling this). I now work less overtime and have less responsibilities for slightly more salary, but it’s still pretty stressful. I’m still dealing with bad Project Managers, and we’ve been having some ridiculous deadline expectations recently. Currently working towards PE licensure. In 2022 I got my PE license and a few promotions, hence the large pay jump. Unfortunately, work stress and bad project managers led to me having panic attacks at work. After I gave it my best shot to stick through it, talk to my bosses, advocate/make changes, and communicate issues, I realized that change was unlikely. Multiple other coworkers and mentors validated my observations and supported my efforts, some coworkers quit due to similar complaints, and after half a year of waiting I accepted that change wasn't going to happen. I also got the bad news that I was locked out of promotions for another 3-5 years, even though my performance reviews repeatedly said I was performing at a much more senior level and while I was performing tasks of a Project Manager on my projects. I looked for other jobs, but got offers for $60-70k for similar responsibilities. So with the support and strong encouragement of my spouse and my therapist, I quit. 4 years of panic attacks, long hours, high stress, relatively low pay, and slow/stagnant career progression convinced me to leave a career that I was passionate about. Life, and where we go from here: For years my now-spouse has emotionally supported me through hard times and kept me grounded, and I’ve in turn helped him learn how to cook, develop a fashion sense, taught him personal finance, and develop his career. With him I’m “building the life I want, then saving for it.”. He’s not entirely on the FIRE train, but he’s 100% supportive and on board with me working towards FIRE and I’m willing to be flexible on spending budgets so he’s still happy (as long as we max out retirement accounts moving forward). We split bills 50/50 while dating/engaged and now have fully joint marital assets. I track spending and manage the budgets and we do roughly monthly meetings to discuss finances. We spend our “boring middle” time training and spoiling our dog, taking expensive dance lessons, playing video games, doing therapy, weight lifting, and enjoying food. Currently saving a lot of cash to buy a house hopefully next year because our apartment is feeling pretty cramped with WFH. 2022 update: Still saving up cash, but waiting on me to find new employment before we buy. Apartment is still feeling kind of cramped, but we love it. I recently connected my husband with one of my friends in the same industry, and thanks to that connection he’s starting a new job soon that will roughly triple his total compensation. This opens a lot more flexibility in our budgets and future plans. 2022 update: This happened and made my career break possible. Woo! I’m pretty unhappy with my current career (work/life balance and compensation) and my career isn’t very compatible with people who want to be active in their child’s lives. So I’m back to looking for new job opportunities for better work-life balance and a better team, but if I can’t find anything that works, we can live off of my husband’s income while I study programming and try to switch to sweet tech money/benefits. Being in a relationship/married has greatly benefited both of us emotionally and financially, and is letting us take greater risks with careers moving forward that could result in increasing the family income. 2022 update: This is in progress. Somewhat delayed by dealing with mental health recovery (burnout, healing from childhood emotional neglect, setting boundaries with family, depression, and spouse getting diagnosed with ADHD and PTSD). We've spent $5k on therapy this year (out of network) and it's been worth every cent. While it feels like I've been on the FIRE train for forever, I realize I've only been working full-time for 3.5 years ~4 years. We still have a long time to go, but we have a pretty good foundation for success in the coming years/decades. submitted by /u/nifFIer [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Monday, November 28, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 28, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly “Help Me FIRE!” thread. Post your detailed information for highly specific advice - November 28, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 28, 2022 at 10:01 am

    Need help applying broader FIRE principles to your own situation? We’re here for you! Post your detailed personal “case study” and ask as many questions as you like, or help others who’ve done the same. Not sure if your questions pertain? Post them anyway…you might be surprised. It’ll be helpful to use our suggested format. Simply copy/paste/fill in/etc. But since everybody’s situation is different, feel free to tailor your layout to your needs. -Introduce yourself -Age / Industry / Location -General goals -Target FIRE Age / Amount / Withdrawal Rate / Location -Educational background and plans -Career situation and plans -Current and future income breakdown, including one-time events -Budget breakdown -Asset breakdown, including home, cars, etc. -Debt breakdown -Health concerns -Family: current situation / future plans / special needs / elderly parents -Other info -Questions? submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly FI Monday Milestone thread - November 28, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 28, 2022 at 10:00 am

    Please use this thread to post your milestones, humblebrags and status updates which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Sunday, November 27, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 27, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • For Those Aware of And Using the HSA Delayed Reimbursement Hack, What Approach Are You Using to Track Receipts For the Super Long Term (20-30 years)?
    by /u/bullshitaccount12345 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 26, 2022 at 9:12 pm

    I was just made aware of this recently, but the short summary is that you can keep track of the HSA eligible expenses you paid for out of pocket and delay reimbursing yourself indefinitely. So you can let your HSA grow for 20 years, then take a reimbursement for whatever amount of medical receipts you have from ANY time in the past (that you had an HSA), and use that money for absolutely anything non medical related with no penalty or tax. If you have $10,000 worth of receipts, take a $10,000 vacation 20 years from now etc. The issue is you need to hold on to those receipts for that amount of time. What system are people using to keep track that will last for the long haul? I’ve heard of people saving receipt photos to google drive etc and then tracking everything in Excel or Google sheets. Just looking for ideas for the most elegant/most robust solutions out there that folks have used. https://blog.healthequity.com/hsa-hack-delay-reimbursement-cash-in-later submitted by /u/bullshitaccount12345 [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Saturday, November 26, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 26, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Friday, November 25, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 25, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly FI Frugal Friday thread - November 25, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 25, 2022 at 10:00 am

    Please use this thread to discuss how amazingly cheap you are. How do you keep your costs low? How do become frugal without taking it to the extremes of frupidity? What costs have you realized could be cut from your life without pain? Use this weekly post to discuss Frugality in general. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are more relaxed here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Thursday, November 24, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 24, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • My 25 Year FI Journey
    by /u/Able-FI-4906 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 23, 2022 at 1:58 pm

    November marks my 25th anniversary working towards financial independence. I hope others might benefit from the observations I gathered over an extended timeframe of perseverance. I began adulthood with severe anxiety regarding finances. I developed FIRE-type thinking before FIRE was a commonly understood philosophy. My thinking developed through personal experiences and later through forums such as these. FIRE thinking helped me to overcome an unhealthy fear of becoming destitute while accelerating other life goals that have brought peace, contentment, and happiness to everyday life. This article documents that journey as a means to give back to a community which has given much to me. I hope it is informative, supportive, and motivating for everyone on their own journey. I will answer questions and offer additional perspective in the comments where possible. This is a throw away account and certain milestones have been obfuscated to create some semblance of privacy and anonymity, though all financial figures quoted are accurate. Outline About Me My FI Philosophy Milestones My Investment Philosophy My Expense Pattern My Evolving View Of FI Lessons & Observations About Me I achieved FI in 2017. I have no plans to RE. I am mid-40s living in a HCOL area. Married with no kids as we prefer partying over parenting. I grew up in upper lower class economic conditions around military bases. My parents struggled to save money outside of any retirement benefits afforded from their jobs. Frequently being unable to have the trips, food, clothes, and toys that the “other” kids had formed an indelible mark. There have been periods where I have had significant anxiety regarding financial safety. I work in tech. My wife is an overworked, underpaid social worker. My career began as a deeply indebted student and after graduation included jobs in training, engineering, product, executive leadership, startup CEO, investing, and governance. I write a well-read technology blog and authored 3 books that are now irrelevant. I travel extensively, sometimes for work, sometimes pleasure. I have visited 50 countries. I have a pilot’s license. I own 2 houses, a plane, 2 cars, and a boat. My FI Philosophy Live Life Below My Means. I should always be saving money, regardless of what my income level is. As long as I earn a W2 income from a job, my monthly expenses should be (on average) at least 50% below the average after-tax income. This also means that it’s OK to increase my spend on quality of life as my means has increased, though it wasn’t until my 30s before I practiced this without stress. As you'll see, having this policy is easier to state than to always follow. FI Definition. Because of my youthful anxiety towards money, difficulty in determining what a viable number of years “in retirement” might be, and debates as to what constitutes a Safe Withdrawal Rate (SWR), I chose to shape a personal definition. For me, FI is the ability to generate enough income from non-W2 activities such that my annual rate of expenses is covered. Income generation can happen from rents, selling volatility, interest, or dividends. In other words, FI is when my net worth continues to grow with or without traditional W2 income. This philosophy may change one day – either because the net worth pool is large or the expected number of years before death materially shrinks. Eliminate Debt, Even If It Is An Economic Mistake. After having bought and sold five different homes, I came to realize that the mental stress of having debt outweighed its economic benefits. Starting sometime around 2018, I decided to eliminate all possible debt, even 2% mortgage debt. While the arbitrage of investment results would have yielded a better overall economic outcome by keeping the debt, that financial gain could never be large enough to compensate for the anxiety-neutralizing-feeling of being “debt free”. Whatever I owned was owned by me alone, and in the unlikely event I were to become unemployed or without income, the future of those assets was solely in my control and not in conjunction with a bank. I execute this policy on life assets, such as my primary home and automobile, and toy assets, such as my plane. This, of course, requires a person to have enough assets to cover the debt, and it took me 15 years to achieve this threshold. Invest To Beat The Market. If I am willing to devote more energy and research time than others (at the cost of fun, family time, etc), then I should be able to make smarter decisions that yield higher results. Split investments into those things which are liquid vs. illiquid. Try to keep most of my available cash in liquid investments. I prefer (and try) to earn equity in illiquid investments through time-based contributions, sweat equity, carried interest, or as a job benefit. This doesn’t always happen, and I have had to outlay cash for angel investments, as a limited partner in a VC fund, and stock purchases for companies I’ve run. Never let others manage our money as they lack incentives to behave as an owner. As you’ll see, lacking this wisdom once cost me $3M in my early career. Milestones Year Net Worth Addl Illiquid Assets W2 Income Material Events 1997 -$95,685 $- $14,110 Pizza Delivery 1998 -$88,299 $- $25,906 Graduate Univ. 1999 $25,612 $- $104,155 Footnote #1 2000 $88,843 $2,700,954 $125,543 Emp. Equity! 🙂 2001 $247,777 $800,056 $232,223 Dotcom Bust 2002 $294,994 $- $144,987 Footnote #2 🙁 2003 $336,523 $- $283,847 First Home Buy 2004 $384,258 $- $207,411 Sold 1st Startup 2005 $436,189 $15,000 $138,845 1st Angel Investment 2006 $558,473 $15,000 $191,384 2nd Home Buy 2007 $614,038 $15,000 $204,448 3rd Home Buy 2008 $545,783 $15,000 $231,926 2009 $638,926 $15,000 $233,656 Footnote #3 🙁 2010 $1,009,650 $25,000 $427,404 2011 $1,333,754 $100,000 $384,681 Started 2nd Startup 2012 $1,637,200 $104,000 $89,187 Became VC Scout 2013 $1,966,303 $407,703 $255,000 2014 $1,777,266 $1,360,905 $230,000 Sold 1st Angel Investment! 2015 $2,313,846 $5,786,086 $243,750 1st VC Distribution 🙂 2016 $2,638,612 $5,210,121 $368,622 Startup Profitable 🙂 2017 $6,422,053 $6,162,527 $802,590 Startup Acquired 🙂 2018 $6,514,291 $7,805,654 $452,129 Paid Off Mortgages 2019 $8,202,434 $9,895,887 $561,954 3rd CEO Gig 2020 $8,079,164 $6,466,506 $801,151 2021 $7,414,909 $10,658,321 $998,761 Footnote #4 🙁 2022 $10,318,719 $9,457,050 $1,065,001 Strong Investment Returns Definitions: Net Worth: The value of all assets where I maintain liquidation control less all known or anticipated liabilities. The assets include fixed assets like my home, plane, and automobiles. While they are illiquid, the choice to effect a sale is within my control. The assets also include the net liquidating value of trading accounts, deferred compensation, 401K, IRAs, and checking accounts. The liabilities include any outstanding debts including mortgages and credit along with any future anticipated taxes that would be due from liquidating 401K, IRA or deferred compensation accounts. Additional Illiquid Assets: This is the mark-to-market (ie, my personal best guess) for the carrying value of additional assets for which I am entitled, but for which I have little control as to when or how they may become liquid. These include angel investments, the value of my shares of VC funds for which I am a limited partner, and carried interest for investments that were sourced as a VC scout. This value does not exclude anticipated taxes which is hard to calculate since some taxes are paid in advance of receiving distributions. It’s possible that the tax burden on the remaining distributions could be <20%. It’s possible that all these assets become worthless, but unlikely, as the $9.4M carrying value is spread across more than 3 dozen businesses and about half of those have already been sold or already profitable. W2 Income: The income received by my wife and I from our W2 jobs. Footnotes: I had an amazing thing happen about 18 months after university. I was working as a grunt in a consulting firm that had some acquisition interest from a large publicly traded company who was making aggressive moves into an area of technology where I had been tasked. The acquisition was moving fast and the firm needed to produce certain deliverables in a week that would normally require months. I stepped up and found a way to deliver the assets. The consultancy got acquired for what was a great outcome for the founder. Without expectation, he surprised me one day and offered to pay off my remaining $80K in student loans. I was hired by the acquiring company as a domain specialist and they doubled my income to $70K. The feeling can only be described as elation followed by a long cry. It was a powerful lesson in what the value of hard, dedicated work can bring. The dotcom boom and bust was another high and low time. The company that acquired me gave a nice pool of options. In the matter of a year, those options were worth nearly $4M at one point. It was intoxicating to watch the value increase nearly every day as the Nasdaq skyrocketed. I had cashed out some of the options when they were available, but most I did not. To make matters worse, I decided to exercise and hold a good chunk of the options which means that taxes were due on the paper profits. I ended up selling a bunch of options to pay those taxes to the tune of nearly $400K. At the time I was unaware of steps that I could take to protect the value of the options that were unvested or that insurance was available which could lock in their value. If I had known that I could spend 10-15% of the value of the options to lock in their value, I would have done it. But I was young and naïve and believing that stocks only go up. The company I was in had a public high of $98 and by the time the dotcom crash had settled they were down to $4. I was able to sell some of the options and netted a profit of around $300K and the government got to hold onto that $400K in early tax payments. It wouldn’t be until the financial crash in 2009 where I could finally reclaim most of these early tax payments to use as a deduction against income (see the next footnote). The financial crisis of 2008-2010 was a difficult time. I was sitting on three homes, had overpaid for the last home, and had mortgages on all three. When the housing crisis kicked in, I was nearly $750K under water across the three properties. You’ll note that my net worth somehow increased. I saved my bacon through research and a little help from the government. Turns out that if you can get a valid short sale offer in California then the bank will eat the losses on the underwater part of the mortgage. And further, Congress passed a law in 2008 or 2009 that allowed taxpayers to write off the loss for up to two years (the $750K mortgage write off is normally taxed as income). It effectively allowed me to sell two of the homes, walk away from the mortgages, and not owe any taxes. This turned into one boost to my net worth as I was starting to carry the losses against the net worth. The consequence was a massive hit to my credit which lasted 7 years. I had no plans to open new credit cards in that time frame, so felt like a good compromise. The other boost to the net worth was the final reconciliation of what happened in Footnote 2, where Congress allowed taxpayers to take any pre-paid taxes from previous years and to deduct 50% of what’s remaining each of the next two years. This dramatically reduced the income on which I owed taxes, gave me a huge refund for two years, and then boosted the net worth. While the stock market had one of its best years in a decade in 2021, it was one of my worst trading years at -21%. For reasons that will be described in future sections, most of my trading for IRAs and trading accounts (~85% of my liquid assets), are traded by selling volatility which is somewhat anti-correlated to buy-and-hold. Strong, unrelenting bull markets that have no price relief are difficult for this style of trading to do well and, thus, the performance hit. In spite of this negative performance, the year was a positive net worth year because of distributions from VC funds, the surprise sale of two angel investments, and a small secondary event (the opportunity to sell a portion of my equity) from the company for which I currently run. My Investment Philosophy Here are the cumulative returns across my investment accounts, 401K, and IRAs. These are all investments where I personally direct and control the nature of how the funds should be deployed. Year Return Material Events 1997 0% 1998 0% 1999 17.8% 401k 2000 9.5% 2001 (5.9%) 2002 1.4% 2003 7.8% Open first trading account 2004 5.9% 2005 16.2% Hired money manager 2006 12.9% 2007 14.2% 2008 (32.1%) Fired money manager 2009 31.1% 2010 2.1% 2011 12.9% Started volatility selling 2012 24.39% >80% of investable assets now in volatility selling 2013 3.93% 2014 (8.3%) 2015 57.5% 2016 24.04% 2017 (.6%) 2018 (.1%) 2019 32.7% 2020 (2.8%) 2021 (31.3%) Horrible year for volatility selling 2022 62.9% Great year for volatility selling My investment philosophy has shifted over 25 years. My current approach, which was enacted in its fullest amount in 2012, involves: 401K. Maximize my participation and get any employer match. These funds go into a fairly conservative 2030 fund which is mostly bonds a little bit of stocks. This currently accounts for 8% of my liquid investable net worth. IRA. Whenever I leave one job, I immediately rollover any 401K funds into a non-ROTH IRA. This accounts for 22% of my investable funds. The IRA trades by selling volatility through iron condors against broad-based indexes like NDX or SPX. Cash. I rotate my checking and emergency cash by investing into tbills, treasuries, and ibonds through Treasury Direct. This has yielded 0.2% to 5% depending upon how interest rates are fluctuating. I mostly do 8 week short term rollovers. It slows in the winter to make any cash needed for taxes available. This equates to 9% of my liquid investable assets. Brokerage. This is all of my other investable liquid assets. The brokerage trades by selling volatility through naked leveraged strangles in a portfolio margin account. This was a strategy that I developed a long time ago after spending dozens of weekends reading and learning about options. Selling volatility isn’t for the faint of heart, but if managed well you can reliably return 16% / year while assuming above average, but not “destroy you” risk. Over the years, I have tried to ‘tweak’ how I sell volatility to boost the returns and this generally has backfired. In 2020 during the down turn I decided to alter the approach in a way which would penalize me if the market were to climb aggressively. And, well, that is what it did for 18 months and I took it on the chin. Selling volatility is very good in soft down and flat markets, such as what we are experiencing in 2022. And, thus, it’s been a spectacular year of returns. While there are no guarantees of the future, I expect to moderate how volatility is sold so that I can more reliably return 15% / year with fewer massive up / down years: ie, lower returns with lower results volatility. If you have done the math, I have 83% of my investable liquid assets in volatility, which is leveraged, and higher risk. It’s also generally anti-correlated to the stock market. In years that the market does well, volatility will not do as well. Why? A few reasons: a) My job and illiquid assets are heavily correlated to how the NASDAQ will perform with many factors beyond my control, b) volatility is a form of anti-correlation to most of my assets creating a blended return which (over time) adds to a combined net worth, c) I am a horrible public markets stock picker; almost every buy-and-hold bet I make doesn’t yield good results; selling volatility is an approach that allows me to not have to make a judgement on fair value or price of the index; therefore it is programmatic in what is needed rather than having to endlessly study 1000s of public market companies to make investment bets. If 30-year treasuries ever breach 10% again like in the 70s, I will put everything I have into them and call it a day. No need to deal with selling volatility if that scenario plays out. Yes, inflation would be monstrous in that scenario, but it would be nice to know that a 10% rate of return is guaranteed for 30 years. And chances are the value of those debt instruments will increase over that time frame yielding a total return higher than 10%. As mentioned previously, even if my expectation for selling volatility is 18% / year on average, then it would economically make sense to have a mortgage or HELOC on my properties, especially when their interest rate was <2%. The arbitrage on a $1M mortgage is over 15% / year and that is before you factor the mortgage interest tax deduction. In my 20s and 30s, this would have been a must-do imperative. Unfortunately, it took me 20 years to realize that the financial gain from the arbitrage doesn’t cover the mental stress of having debt with a creditor who takes a senior lien position. My Expense Pattern I’ve tried to structure my “run rate” expenses to comfortable sit below my after tax W2 income. Investment gains and other assets generally should not be sourced for funding the normal lifestyle of which I live. My wife and I are generally minimalists, though for the few things we own or experience, we are comfortable in purchasing a premium product or experience. This especially includes vacations, for which we will attempt to do one 4 week trip every few years, and a number of 5 day and 8 day trips each year. I consider my “run rate” expenses to include mortgages, insurance, food, fuel, utilities, vacations, furniture, electronics, medical bills, clothes, jewelry. Generally, anything that we need to spend money on that isn’t considered an investment or necessary for us to live. To better reflect the spending patterns, I am excluding any lump sum payments such as a down payment made for a mortgage. The reverse is also true, excluding any lump sum payment received when selling a home. My historical tax rate has been ~32% across federal and state taxes after netting out any credits and deductions. I’ve been generally tax inefficient during my income years as I’ve always seen that the steps necessary to lower the tax rate meaningfully were too much of an inconvenience to warrant the potential gains. I expect our effective tax rate to inch towards 38% in the coming years. ​ Year Expenses % W2 Income Comments 1997 $12,555 89% College years 1998 $22,194 86% 1999 $42,904 41% 2000 $47,777 38% 2001 $41,150 18% 2002 $55,208 38% 2003 $106,086 37% Mortgages add up 2004 $139,899 67% 2005 $84,790 61% 2006 $72,874 38% 2007 $106,163 52% 2008 $118,023 51% 2009 $104,085 45% 2010 $192,593 45% Expensive vacations 2011 $190,074 49% 2012 $168,302 189% $0 startup salary for 6 months. 2013 $180,788 71% 4 intl vacations 2014 $155,078 67% 2015 $188,987 78% 2016 $185,309 50% 2017 $201,109 25% Lifestyle creep 2018 $267,725 59% Pilot training is expensive 2019 $204,598 36% Paid off mortgages 2020 $97,512 12% COVID lock down == little spend 2021 $134,398 13% Paid off plane mortgage 2022 $167,189 16% My Work History I only consistently made $250K of W2 income starting in 2016. At this time, my net worth was $2.6M with another $5.2M in illiquid assets. Our average income over those previous 16 years was $235K with 8 years making less than $200K. While $200K is a very generous income and above the average of most people, my key point is that the combined net worth of $7.8M is far above the $3.8M in taxable income earned over that same period. A persistent, hard working family that chooses to spend below their earnings that intelligently invests their savings is able to build significant worth beyond the limits of what their job provides. Like the stock market, my career has its ups and downs. Interestingly, it’s marked by a number of short stints interspersed among long stints. I’ve worked in large publicly traded companies and as employee #1 in a startup. In my 25-year working career, the longest period of not having a W2 paying job has been 3 months. I have only maintained a single W2 paying job at one time. I am, however, allowed to simultaneously angel invest, be a VC scout, sit on boards, and consult for companies across the tech ecosystem while I perform my primary function as employee. All of these additional activities help to build my portfolio of additional illiquid assets. I am earning sweat equity rather than having to outlay significant cash to build these positions. ​ Period Role Comments 1997-2003 Engineer, Tech Expert Joined 15-person startup, acquired by public company after 12 months, multiple geeky roles at the acquirer. 2003-2004 CEO Ran a 10-person consulting company specializing in geekery. Fire sale acquisition by another consulting company & I was not hired. 2004 Product Joined a hot data startup to run product. Culture fail as the founder was a jerk. Quit after 1 week. This company eventually sold 2 years later for $900M! It would have been a big payday. No regrets, though. 2005-2011 Product Mid-sized, fast growing public company. 2011 Product VP @ very large public company. Reported to famous visionary. Resigned after 3 months (famous person was a jerk). Offered $1M / yr to stay and declined. No regrets, though. 2011-2017 CEO Started tech company. Sold to a large public company. Almost bankrupt 3 times before finding fit, growing revenues, and becoming profitable. 2017-2019 GM Ran $100M business unit that included my startup for the company that acquired us. 2019-2022 CEO Hired as CEO of private company. 500 employees, profitable, setting sights on $100M in revs. My Evolving View Of Financial Independence While young, my view of financial worth was measured by net worth. “Will I ever be worth 1 MILLION dollars?!?”, as if that number held a magical quality that, if achieved, suddenly made one financially well-off. The day I became a millionaire was anti-climatic other than the entertainment value of seeing two commas on my tracking sheet. And that financial milestone was quickly discarded in favor of achieving the next million because I didn’t feel safe / stable / protected with just having one. And then the next one, and next one after that. Net worth is not a good way to quantify your financial independence. I’m familiar with the 4% SWR, and it’s always struck me as a challenging measure of whether someone has the financial means to retire early. There are too many challenges: how long do you live, changing macro conditions, unknowns about social safety nets, and so on. But even worse, the 4% SWR is a model where, generally, your net worth is likely to decline over those years depending upon how the investment portfolio performs. As a way to deal with this anxiety, I’ve shifted my definition of financial independence to be defined by my ability to continue living my current lifestyle through gains made from investable assets. For 2023, this limited view would generate ~$600K (after netting taxes) for spending against a lifestyle run rate which is effectively $200K. Selling volatility has a lot of risk associated since it is leveraged. A financial independence definition that depends upon leveraged risk introduces some peace of mind issues. This is the definition I currently use in order to claim that I am financially independent. However, I also track a definition of financial independence that is virtually risk free: FI is when my run rate of life expenses is below the interest that can be earned from buying 30-year treasuries. At 4% yield this would generate ~$190K after taxes. The net after tax payments would benefit from not having state income tax and our family being in a lower average tax bracket. With my life expenses under $200K due to a lack of mortgage, I am currently bumping along on this threshold. Half of my annual expenses are vacations and luxury items (plane maintenance is not cheap) which could easily be eliminated if we decided we wanted to retire early and spend well under the interest generated threshold. But we won’t. We will probably carry on because we love our work. As our investable assets increase, we will allow lifestyle creep wine, vacations, and hobbies over the coming years. Lessons and Observations Perseverance Yields Results. Having a long history of steady savings can lead to big outcomes. While the sale of my company did create a boost in my wealth, the benefit of compounding savings over decades has lead to a greater contribution to the overall wealth. I’ve never been one to chase quick profits or fads (crypto, though I do own $2K of Bitcoin), and instead see that the professional and technology skills that I can acquire through self-study and life experiences pay larger dividends than with gambling investments. Always Have A Project. Whether it’s becoming an expert in a new technology, learning the nuances of how strategic business development is orchestrated, or earning a pilot’s license, having 2-3 ongoing passion projects creates contentment, builds worldly skills, and opens work / financial opportunities that I was not seeking or aware of. Culturally Fail Fast. I’ve been in 4 work scenarios where there was a culture mismatch. Either the people around were unpleasant or there was a limited interest in peers to socially connect. Get out of those situations as fast as possible, within days if necessary. I’ve been fortunate to listen to my inner voice and the longest I was in an unpleasant environment was 9 months. In two of these fail fast scenarios, had I stayed for more than 4 years, I would have earned more than $5M in each scenario. They were economic mistakes but like successes. Peace Of Mind Matters More Than Profit. It took me the better part of my young adulthood, but I sleep peacefully by structuring my finances and earnings in such a way where I have the maximal peace of mind given my risk tolerance. The things that eat at me would be consistently having expenses above my income and a financial independence strategy that required my net worth to decline due to withdrawals. Over Sacrificing Will Sabotage Important Relationships. Being aggressive in your career and sacrificing time with family, friends, and lovers hasn’t created enough of leapfrog in my FI journey that warrants the cost (often sabotage) that will come to those relationships. I was a relentless worker in my early years. Now I am a wise worker with a structured balance between work and play. Maintain A War Time Mindset With Investing. Invest assuming that your worst-case nightmare scenario will happen. With this mindset, every investment has risk mitigations (both in my mindset and structurally). By thinking this way, you will be prepared emotionally and skill wise to act when negative scenarios occur. I used to be apprehensive about selling volatility with reasonable risk. It requires me to do things such as selling naked calls. Most traders hear the oft repeated words, "naked calls have unlimited loss potential!" and immediately run for the hills. I worked for months to avoid ever having a naked call go in the money as that would be the nightmare. Well, one time it happened, they were in the money, and I was frozen. But the nightmare was much worse in my dreams, learned how to trade out of it, and recognized that trading as if everything was always in the money made everything easier to absorb. So that is how I invest and trade - it's war time, nothing will go right, and have a plan for every possible contingency. submitted by /u/Able-FI-4906 [link] [comments]

  • Weekly Self-Promotion Thread - Wednesday, November 23, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 23, 2022 at 10:03 am

    Self-promotion (ie posting about projects/businesses that you operate and can profit from) is typically a practice that is discouraged in /r/financialindependence, and these posts are removed through moderation. This is a thread where those rules do not apply. However, please do not post referral links in this thread. Use this thread to talk about your blog, talk about your business, ask for feedback, etc. If the self-promotion starts to leak outside of this thread, we will once again return to a time where 100% of self-promotion posts are banned. Please use this space wisely. Link-only posts will be removed. Put some effort into it. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Wednesday, November 23, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 23, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Taking back ownership of your time
    by /u/dypeverdier (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 22, 2022 at 10:06 pm

    One of the reasons I seek to FIRE is the simple reason I wish to own more of my time. Money can be seen as the currency of time. The reason why something costs money is that someone put their time into creating the thing I am buying. When you spend money, you spend someone else's time they put into serving you. If you are a billionaire, you could spend several lifetimes in a very short amount of time. My time is the most important thing I can offer to the world. Be it offering to my friends or family, to work, to enjoyment, or the community. This makes our time more precious than we might want to admit. Because the future is inherently unknown, we can never know for sure how much time we have. Do I have 50 years, perhaps only 20? Who of you has wished you had more time for friends and family? That you could work less and enjoy life more? Some love their work and would do it for free. But a lot of us think they would be happier spending their time in different ways. If you look at it this way, every subscription service I pay for, every new car I buy, every time I buy something I don't really need I pay with time I could have used in a more fulfilling way. This is why being frugal, saving money, being mindful of how one spends time, and seeking FIRE as a goal is something I strive for, to own my own time. Does anyone else think of it this way? submitted by /u/dypeverdier [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Tuesday, November 22, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 22, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Give back and get smart on taxes at the same time
    by /u/lizref (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 22, 2022 at 1:34 am

    I want to highlight a cool volunteer opportunity that I think fits very well with the FIRE community. There is always plenty of discussion here asking how to give back, how to occupy your time after FIRE, and most importantly, how to learn about taxes.   I posted this last year and it received some interest so I wanted to send out another reminder to the community that this program is gearing up again for the next tax season.   I'm starting my second year with an agency as a Volunteer Income Tax Assistant (VITA) with a local refugee agency. The program trains you on tax screening so you can provide free tax prep services to people in need. You don't need to have any prior tax experience, they train you on everything. I started last year with very little understanding of how the tax system works (always had someone else file my taxes), and now I've gained deep understanding of the tax code. VITA programs offer an impactful way for people in this community to use their skills and their passion to give back.   I'm not advocating for a particular program, but if you google VITA in your local area I bet you'll find some programs. A lot of them are even fully virtual. Seems like a great way to help out whether you're FIRE'd or not.   Cheers! submitted by /u/lizref [link] [comments]

  • What are the tips/tricks for getting a job you're overqualified for? (for semi-fi/barista-fi)
    by /u/nullstring (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 21, 2022 at 9:39 pm

    Suppose you're semi-fi and looking for a lower impact job to help sustain you. What are some tips/tricks to get such a job? Things like: Do you really really tone back your resume to hide how over-qualified you are? Are you honest with prospective employers about why you're looking to "downgrade"? Or what reasoning do you give? For context, I am an unemployed software developer who is 'grey-area-fi'. (To me, calculating exactly when I can personally become financially independent has been difficult. But I am probably fi.. probably.. The current market doesn't help though.) I've been unemployed for about 7 months, and it hasn't really been going that well to be honest. It seems like I may need some structure in my life to stay active. Thus, I am looking to go back to work but probably to something low-key, so to speak. BTW, I'm hoping to hear from people who've actually done this or are in the process rather than just those who are speculating. submitted by /u/nullstring [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Monday, November 21, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 21, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly “Help Me FIRE!” thread. Post your detailed information for highly specific advice - November 21, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 21, 2022 at 10:01 am

    Need help applying broader FIRE principles to your own situation? We’re here for you! Post your detailed personal “case study” and ask as many questions as you like, or help others who’ve done the same. Not sure if your questions pertain? Post them anyway…you might be surprised. It’ll be helpful to use our suggested format. Simply copy/paste/fill in/etc. But since everybody’s situation is different, feel free to tailor your layout to your needs. -Introduce yourself -Age / Industry / Location -General goals -Target FIRE Age / Amount / Withdrawal Rate / Location -Educational background and plans -Career situation and plans -Current and future income breakdown, including one-time events -Budget breakdown -Asset breakdown, including home, cars, etc. -Debt breakdown -Health concerns -Family: current situation / future plans / special needs / elderly parents -Other info -Questions? submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly FI Monday Milestone thread - November 21, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 21, 2022 at 10:00 am

    Please use this thread to post your milestones, humblebrags and status updates which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Guaranteed 4% SWR success!
    by /u/jason_for_prez (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 20, 2022 at 3:46 pm

    The 4% SWR rule of thumb was created with the goal of ensuring you don't run out of money within 30 years. Over the past 100 years in the US, it has had about a 95% success rate. And a lot of discussions in this community are about how to identify if you are on track to become one of those 5% failures, how to manage it, and how to avoid it. Well, what if you didn't have to? 30 year TIPS are now CPI+1.6%. So if you put all your money into 30 year TIPS and spend exactly 4% every year with inflation adjustments, then you will still have 0.9% of your portfolio remaining after30 years! As long as the US government is able to continue paying its debts, you're safe. And if the US government can't pay its debts, then your 4% SWR isn't going to be safe no matter where you put it. I'm not doing this since I need my money to last longer than 30 years. submitted by /u/jason_for_prez [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Sunday, November 20, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 20, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Saturday, November 19, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on November 19, 2022 at 10:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]


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