Financial Independence and Legit Side Money Ideas For Techies and Geeks

Legit Side Money Ideas for Techies and Geeks

App Icon Apple Books
Dive into a comprehensive AWS CCP CLF-C02 Certification guide, masterfully weaving insights from Tutorials Dojo, Adrian Cantrill, Stephane Maarek, and AWS Skills Builder into one unified resource.

AI Dashboard is available on the Web, Apple, Google, and Microsoft, PRO version

Financial Independence and Legit Side Money Ideas For Techies and Geeks

Programmers, developers, software engineers, and other tech-savvy geeks are often some of the most financially independent people out there. That’s because they often have the skills to turn their side hustles into legit businesses that can generate significant income. In fact, many of the most successful tech entrepreneurs got their start by developing apps and selling them on popular app stores.

Financial Independence and Legit Side Money Ideas For Techies and Geeks

But you don’t need to be a whiz kid to make good money from your technical skills. Even if you’re not interested in starting your own company, there are plenty of opportunities to freelance or consult on projects that can pay well. And with the global economy increasingly reliant on technology, those skills are in high demand. So if you’re looking to boost your income, consider using your geeky talents to earn some extra cash. Who knows, you might just find yourself becoming a millionaire in the process.

This blog is about Clever Questions, Answers, Posts, discussions, links about:

If you’re a programmer, developer, software engineer, geek, or computer scientist, then you know that financial independence is important. After all, who wants to be tied down to a job they hate just because they need the money? The good news is that there are plenty of legitimate side money ideas out there for techies and geeks. Here are just a few:

  1. Programmers can make money by developing new apps and selling them on app stores like Apple’s App Store or Google Play.
  2. Developers can create websites or online courses teaching others how to code or use specific software programs.
  3. Software engineers can offer consulting services to companies who need help designing or improving their systems.
  4. Geeks can start a blog about their favorite topic (technology, science fiction, gaming, etc.) and make money through advertising or affiliate sales.
  5. Computer scientists can develop new algorithms or sell their existing ones to companies willing to pay for them.

So if you’re looking for ways to make some extra cash on the side, don’t despair – there are plenty of options out there for you. Do some research and see which one might be the best fit for your skills and interests. With a little effort, you could be well on your way to financial independence in no time!

Making money isn’t that big of a deal especially if a person is determined, The primary cause of poverty is ignorance and nothing else.

It stars with a burning desire to learn and your willingness to practice all you’ve learned and make the mistakes needed in other to get the a greater height, “that is how financial progression is achieved and sustained.”


AI Unraveled: Demystifying Frequently Asked Questions on Artificial Intelligence (OpenAI, ChatGPT, Google Gemini, Generative AI, Discriminative AI, xAI, LLMs, GPUs, Machine Learning, NLP, Promp Engineering)

in the aspect of making money online with a laptop, you can try out the following listed below….

  1. Affiliate Marketing.
  2. Selling on Amazon, eBay, Etsy, and Craigslist.
  3. Blogging.
  4. Niche E-commerce.
  5. Your Own YouTube Channel.
  6. Selling E-books.
  7. Develop Apps.
  8. Invest/trade cryptocurrency.

To be a master and be really successful in any of the listed, one has to first learn them before anything else goes.

And if you’re interested in cryptocurrency but too Busy and don’t have to time to learn, you can contact me I’ll teach you how a newbie trader can make profit in crypto quickly.

If you are looking for an all-in-one solution to help you prepare for the AWS Cloud Practitioner Certification Exam, look no further than this AWS Cloud Practitioner CCP CLF-C02 book

Legit Side Money Ideas on Quora

  • Tronix App new method for earning passive income through Telegram
    by Roman News EN (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 11:41 pm

    TRONIX APP is a groundbreaking Telegram game that lets users earn cryptocurrency by completing various tasks and engaging in mini-games.Continue reading on Medium »

  • Make Easy Money While Grocery Shopping!
    by J.R. Gutierrez (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 11:34 pm

    Imagine turning everyday tasks into a source of income without stepping outside your comfort zone.Continue reading on Medium »

  • Quick Ways To Make Money Online
    by Online Oracle (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 10:35 pm

    Do you want to make quick money online?Continue reading on Medium »

  • How to live your Dream life with 1 habit
    by Rashz (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 10:13 pm

    Transform your mindset to transform your lifeContinue reading on Medium »

  • Do You Understand the Difference Between Digital Real Estate and Digital Economy?
    by Ijigban Daniel Oketa, Inventor of H-TIPS. (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 10:00 pm

    Digital real estate and the digital economy are interconnected concepts, but they refer to different aspects of the online world. Here’s a…Continue reading on Medium »

  • Inheriting farm
    by /u/bamfrozen (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 19, 2024 at 9:53 pm

    Inheriting a farm with about a half mile of road frontage on a busy highway >70000 cars per day. The road front is currently zoned as agricultural (not agricultural preservation) What would it take to subdivide this bit of land on the highway and find a commercial tenant? There are other commercial tenants in this same area. Located in Maryland. submitted by /u/bamfrozen [link] [comments]

  • The Disadvantages of Not Investing in ChatGPT Stores to Make Money Online in 2024
    by Beneficial Information (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 9:15 pm

    In the rapidly evolving landscape of online business, staying ahead of the curve is crucial for financial success. One of the most…Continue reading on Medium »

  • Dave Nick — Online Business Models (50 Battle-Tested Ways To Make $1000 Online)
    by Jason Atwood (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 8:53 pm

    50 Battle-Tested Ways To Make $1000 Online: Dave Nick’s Online Business ModelsContinue reading on Medium »

  • Get Paid to Share Your Opinions: Try Out the Latest Apps and Earn $25-$35 Per Hour!
    by MoneyandMore (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 8:09 pm

    Are you passionate about technology and enjoy exploring the latest apps? Your opinions are more valuable than you might think. In fact…Continue reading on Medium »

  • OLSP System Review: Turn Your Home Into a High-Ticket Commission Factory
    by Annette Lode (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 7:59 pm

    OLSP System Review: Turn Your Home Into a High-Ticket Commission Factory offers an in-depth look at how Wayne Crowe’s innovative system…Continue reading on Medium »

  • Releasing the Grip of Stress-Activated Genetics
    by Johanna Lynn (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 7:31 pm

    The foundation of your business has been built yet we all know that the sands are shifting.Continue reading on Medium »

  • What Net Worth (not income) in your opinion qualifies as "Rich" in the United States?
    by /u/UnluckyNet2881 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 19, 2024 at 7:08 pm

    Conducting a quick survey here on Reddit. submitted by /u/UnluckyNet2881 [link] [comments]

  • YouTube Automation using Python: Implementing a Local LLM & RSS Feeds
    by Yery O'Dell (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 6:12 pm

    Photo by Christian Wiediger on UnsplashContinue reading on Medium »

  • Unlocking Financial Success: A Comprehensive Guide with ‘The Wealth Signal
    by Abdullah Ch (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 5:04 pm

    “The Wealth Signal” is a transformative guide designed to help readers unlock the secrets to financial success and independence.Continue reading on Medium »

  • The Secret Weapon of Spoonies: Building a $1,000/Month Passive Income Empire (Without Leaving The...
    by Hamza Sameen (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 5:01 pm

    Chronic illness slowing you down financially? This guide reveals surprising passive income ideas for #spoonies to build wealthContinue reading on Medium »

  • Financial Freedom: Unlock Your Path to Financial Independence
    by Gowtham Soundararajan (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 4:11 pm

    Lisa, a young professional in her late 20s, always wanted to be financially free. She and her friends dealt with student loans and high…Continue reading on Medium »

  • How I Increase My Medium Blog Traffic
    by Hazel Paradise (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 4:11 pm

    7 Ways to Increase Your Blog Traffic in 30 DaysContinue reading on Medium »

  • 6 Ways to Create Passive Income With No Money
    by TheLuWizz (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 4:07 pm

    Struggling to Make Ends Meet? If so, you’re not alone.Continue reading on Coinmonks »

  • The Fast Track to Freedom: Unveiling the Quickest Paths to Passive Income Online
    by Billionaires_Success_Club (Passive Income on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 4:04 pm

    The allure of passive income — earning money while you sleep — is undeniable. But let’s be honest, the “get rich quick” schemes are just…Continue reading on Medium »

  • What is a Non Qualified Annuity: A Guide for Everyone
    by Laura Martin (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 3:34 pm

    Boost your finances with bugaza.com. Discover the path to financial security with Bugaza.com! Explore the world of annuities and enjoy…Continue reading on Medium »

  • Understanding the Basic Function of an Annuity: A Comprehensive Guide
    by Laura Martin (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 3:32 pm

    Boost your finances with bugaza.com. Ready to unlock the potential of your money? Bugaza.com offers expert insights into annuities and…Continue reading on Medium »

  • Which of the Following is Associated with an Immediate Annuity?
    by Mila Hafenstein (Money Making Ideas on Medium) on June 19, 2024 at 2:38 pm

    Get money on sudohackers.com. Stressed by annuity limitations? Discover sudohackers.com for swift money transfers and insightful financial…Continue reading on Medium »

  • Weekly Self-Promotion Thread - Wednesday, June 19, 2024
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 19, 2024 at 9:03 am

    Self-promotion (ie posting about projects/businesses that you operate and can profit from) is typically a practice that is discouraged in /r/financialindependence, and these posts are removed through moderation. This is a thread where those rules do not apply. However, please do not post referral links in this thread. Use this thread to talk about your blog, talk about your business, ask for feedback, etc. If the self-promotion starts to leak outside of this thread, we will once again return to a time where 100% of self-promotion posts are banned. Please use this space wisely. Link-only posts will be removed. Put some effort into it. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Wednesday, June 19, 2024
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 19, 2024 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • New Malaysia My Second Home Rules (retirement visa)
    by /u/new22003 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 19, 2024 at 8:19 am

    The "new" rules for the Malaysia My Second Home (MM2H or MMSH) retirement visa were just released. It is meh compared to the programme from 10 years ago. TLDR $150,000 USD Fixed Deposit, can withdraw 50% of that for home purchase, health, etc, after approval. Application fee of RM1000 ($212 USD) 5 year visa, renewable. You can find the basic details here. https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2024/06/17/what039s-new-for-the-mm2h-programme Also FYI the states of Sarawak and Sabah (Malaysian Borneo) are contesting the rules and will likely release their own versions with lower investment and a longer visa. Sarawak has had its own version for the past several years. Sabah was going to release their own version June 1 but the federal announcement changed that. submitted by /u/new22003 [link] [comments]

  • What are the benefits to after tax or Roth in-plan conversion at work?
    by /u/holistictales (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 19, 2024 at 4:53 am

    Found out my company offers something called "after-tax and Roth conversion" outside of the $23k I contribute to a 401k. What would be the benefits to doing this? If my income is too high to get a Roth contribution tax deduction, does it make sense to do this or is this "Roth conversion" different than the Roth IRA accounts where there are income limits to contribution? In other words, appreciate help translating the info below as if I'm five 🙂 Traditional after-tax contributions allow you to contribute the IRS limit for pretax and Roth after-tax contributions. You can make traditional after-tax contributions at any time—either while making pre-tax and Roth contributions or starting after reaching the pretax and Roth after-tax IRS limit. If you choose to start after-tax contributions, after you’ve reached the IRS limit for pretax and Roth after-tax, you can have your 401(k) payroll contributions automatically converted to traditional after-tax money You can convert all or a portion of your pretax and/or traditional after-tax savings to Roth money within the 401(k) plan - you can even set up automatic conversions. You’ll owe ordinary income tax on the pretax money converted to Roth in the tax year of the conversion. If you convert after-tax money to Roth, you’ll owe taxes on the earnings in the year in which the conversion is made (unless you setup auto conversion). Taxes must be paid from assets outside of the 401(k) plan. submitted by /u/holistictales [link] [comments]

  • Can you help me find this book on the down side of generational wealth?
    by /u/avheuv (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 10:58 pm

    There was a book that I read several years ago that was written by a financial manager who worked with several (very) wealthy families. The book provided specific stories about those levels of wealth were harmful or destructive for those families. I cannot for the life of me remember the name of this book. Does anyone know what it is called? Edit: Thanks for the suggestions. I haven't seen it listed yet. This book does not contain any advice for building generational wealth, but more stories about various families. One story I recall is of an older woman looking out from her beach house over a group of young people having a BBQ on the beach. Her reflection was that she was lonely with her family only interested in her wealth. (In case that rings a bell.) Edit 2: Fables of Fortune - https://www.amazon.com.au/Fables-Fortune-What-Rich-People/dp/1937110125 submitted by /u/avheuv [link] [comments]

  • I got my question into Slate's Pay Dirt about convincing my spouse to FIRE - again
    by /u/permanent-vacation25 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 8:52 pm

    Two years ago, I got my question answered in Slate's Pay Dirt column. Here's my FI post about it: I got my question into Slate's Pay Dirt about convincing my spouse to FIRE Well, apparently it was an interesting question, because the recently answered another version that I had submitted. Based on the ages, I would have submitted it two years ago as well (since we're 47 and 45 now) and they dug it out of their mailbox to answer it last month. Personal finance: My wife and I finally saved enough for early retirement. Now she wants to throw it away. (slate.com) I wouldn't say a lot has changed in two years. In the first question, you can see we had about $3 million saved in retirement accounts. Now it's up to $4 million between continued contributions and growth. I asked my workplace for a 12 week sabbatical. After a lot of hemming and hawing, they granted me 4 weeks of unpaid time off. I took it as well as burned my covid-banked PTO, taking about 11 weeks off total for the year. We went multiple vacations, some fabulous and some low-key. My wife and I spent one week going to happy hours every day while the kids were in a summer camp. And I just spent a couple weeks basically chilling at home. I didn't accomplish many of those house projects I mentioned in my question, but who's to blame me? With only two weeks to spare I couldn't waste it like that! The sabbatical/unpaid time off, while not as long as I would have liked nor nearly as long as commenters recommended, was quite helpful. It mostly cured my burnout. It helped me realize that there's no magic bullet. That even if I magically had 24 hours a day to do whatever I wanted, nothing would change about my life unless I change it. I haven't stopped working yet. Worse, when I wrote two years ago, I had the best manager I'd ever had. He left (retired, traveling and learning a new language and having lunch with a former coworker every week) and was replaced with a manager I do not particularly like. He's not the worst manager I've ever had and I am not the type of person to let a bad manager slow me down. Qualitatively, I think my wife is more open to the idea of me not working than she was two years ago. If nothing else, now she brings it up sometimes and not just me. And she doesn't complain when I bring it up like she did 3 years ago. submitted by /u/permanent-vacation25 [link] [comments]

  • The truth about purpose: a couple questions
    by /u/chefscounterfan (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 2:32 pm

    One of the things I've been trying to be very intentional about as I get close enough to make out the blurry likeness of financial independence in the not-too-distant future is the role and relative importance of purpose. There are so many stories out there of people who felt aimless once they'd reached the point they no longer had to work that I ask every person I can a) how relevant was having a purpose to you when you had to work, and b) now that you don't have to work, do you feel you need a life's purpose to be fulfilled? Many financially independent and/or retired people share their perspectives quite willingly. It's helpful because while the accumulation phase of preparing for independence is straightforward, the "what comes next" part in terms of psychological/emotional lens is less clear. Will I enjoy the things I think I will? Will we be able to go from a life tethered to our professions to one unmoored from what has been important for over three decades? Questions for the financially independent or already retired: Aside from family, what has your experience been like with the concept of having a purpose? Do you need one? Did you need a purpose beforehand? How have your thoughts evolved now that you are independent and/or retired? Thanks in advance. It seems to be one of the most challenging mental aspects of this journey and I'm grateful to have found a place where people are willing to share their experiences, wisdom and journeys. submitted by /u/chefscounterfan [link] [comments]

  • Taking time off in the middle
    by /u/aryastarkia (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 2:15 pm

    Net worth ~1m. ~500k Roth 401k, 300k home equity, 200k in company stock. I spend ~45k a year but could cut a decent bit , income is ~220k. 30 years old. I'm completely burned out. We've been through 5 senior directors in 6 months, I've had 4 direct managers in the past year and I've been working crazy hours on a project that is the number one company priority but my work isn't really valued by the new leadership team. I know it's frowned upon to quit a job without a new one lined up, but I was thinking about liquidating 100k in company stock, spending six months getting some rnr, traveling to visit family who live all over the world, and just focusing on personal growth (wrapping up some house projects, getting back into shape). I'm in software engineering if it matters. One side of me knows it could have high risk of re-entering the job market making significantly less, but I'm so burned out even if I job hop im not sure I will perform at my usual standards. Is it really that bad to take some time to travel and recharge before I jump into a new opportunity? submitted by /u/aryastarkia [link] [comments]

  • Which other financial subs have the best communities and mods, which ones have the worst?
    by /u/Frosty-the-hoeman (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 1:17 pm

    Something is going on over at HENRYFinance, where the mods are removing comments and banning folks for suggesting they might join another sub. I’m curious which finance related subreddits have the best communities & moderation to be a part of? Thanks! submitted by /u/Frosty-the-hoeman [link] [comments]

  • Getting Closer to Retirement Goals, why does it feel so weird?
    by /u/AcceptableQuarter554 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 1:14 pm

    After we got married, my wife and I would discuss retirement goals where we wanted to figure out a way to retire well before we hit 65. Two kids in daycare peaking at 24k a year kind of acted as a rude awakening, but we chugged through it. We are at 4 years since our last kid left daycare, my wife picked up a substantial pay increase and we have been living with our cheap attitude gained from really lean years. Its obviously hard to talk about the ideas with family or friends who might not be in the same situation. We are at a 40%+ savings rate I know a lot of people talk about not spending more as you make more... somehow we did it. Started doing some vacations every few months, but those are usually 4k each all in. Right now we are in a LCOL/MCOL area, income is 195k gross, post tax maybe 170k in what we are able to spend or invest yearly. We max out her 401k (6% match), max out the HSA (1-2k company yearly) (its an investment account, we don't use it) and max out my yearly IRA. I was doing more traditional IRA, but I'm shifting to Roth currently. The rest funnels into savings where I keep about 15-20k on hand and the rest is invested in a post-tax account. Monthly expenses are comically low. Our 2200 sq ft home has a monthly payment of 900 after we pulled off a refi at 2.85%. One car payment at a time as we hold onto them for 6-8 years. On average we spend about 85-90k a year expenses all in, including a few vacations a year. We've bounced credit card deals for points and miles and have basically had free airfare for all our travel. No CC debt, like 2k left in student loans that are $76 a month, one car note and a mortgage sitting at 220k. The past few years the accounts have grown substantially. Felt like we were just getting over the 250k hump combined across all accounts a few years ago. Last year we were in the 300s, and at year end things had grown more than our combined incomes. We were at 500k this Jan, and right now we are at 750k. I know it won't grow that fast forever, but things have really helped to accelerate plans. The spread is 250k in a post-tax account, 500k across the tax advantaged accounts. We've allocated 18k per kid in 529s so far, and with 8 years left until the first hits college we should be able to cover a few years for them each. The main retirement goal is to reach a point where a 4-5% draw is around roughly what we spend. I think on current growth we might be solidly in that range in 5 years where my wife can scale back from her job to something more relaxing. I don't think we'd want to retire fully, so some employment will be in there and that will act as a buffer as we sort things out. For those who have set a retirement goal decade or more out and are finally seeing some light at the end of the tunnel... how do you prepare? Investment people I've spoken to really just fall into the category of how to grow money, or assume I don't have much to invest. Most are clueless though about the tax side of the equation. So far everything has been self-directed or self-researched. submitted by /u/AcceptableQuarter554 [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Tuesday, June 18, 2024
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Non-Inflation Adjusted Pension - How to Factor into FI Number?
    by /u/LeeLifesonPeart (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 8:14 am

    I will receive a state pension that receives a non-compounding 2% increase every year. In other words, if the pension is $50k, then every year it increases by a flat $1k (2%), making it $51k in year 2, $52k in year 3, $53k in year 4, etc. There is a provision where if the purchasing power falls below 85% then they'll supplement the payout, but historically these have been rare, in spite of high inflation. For example, pensioners who retired in 2005 didn't see a supplemental payment until 2022. Given this, how would you factor the $50k pension into your retirement number? For instance, say you anticipate a standard 30-year retirement and want $100k in annual retirement income. Typically, the other $50k could be covered by a $1.25M portfolio with a 4% WR. But given that the pension will lose purchasing power over time, it seems like the portfolio number needs to be higher, but how much higher? How would you determine your FI number in this case? FYI, I do not pay into SS, so this is not a factor. Thanks in advance for your thoughts and advice! submitted by /u/LeeLifesonPeart [link] [comments]

  • If you plan to pay for your kids’ college, how much are you saving?
    by /u/trendy_pineapple (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 18, 2024 at 1:35 am

    Do you have a target number for their 529? Are you saving in a taxable account? Planning for financial aid? I’m planning to FIRE before my oldest goes to college primarily using a Roth conversion ladder, so our income and relevant assets will be pretty low. I’m not sure how much I should count on financial aid vs saving aggressively in 529s. Or perhaps saving in a taxable brokerage for more flexibility. How are others thinking about this? I know lots of people either want their kid to have skin in the game or don’t see the value of college at all, but this question is specifically for those people who are planning on paying for their kids’ college submitted by /u/trendy_pineapple [link] [comments]

  • Can’t tell anyone, just here for the GFYs
    by /u/Fragrant-Badger6608 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 17, 2024 at 9:35 pm

    Long time DCA automatic investor, put my head down, went to work, raised a family, looked up 35 years later and my portfolio is over 2 million. My wife and I are 57yrs, 3 kids (1 college living at home, 1 college sharing apartment with roommate, 1 married with 2 grandkids and 3rd on the way). Here’s rest of the details: 82K cash 1.5M equity investments (Roth/401k) 640k real estate (115k remaining @3.6%) 50k annual pension 25k annual VA disability Currently making 170k annually (data scientist in defense consulting) and wife (teacher) 50k. Not looking for advice, just can’t seem to discuss with anyone. submitted by /u/Fragrant-Badger6608 [link] [comments]

  • Finally joined the 2 comma club at 35!
    by /u/bondsman333 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 17, 2024 at 6:42 pm

    Finally made it! The big 1MM. I celebrated today by buying a new kindle - my old one wouldn't hold a charge. Had a 20% off coupon. I got married 2 weeks ago - so I actually became a millionaire when we signed the documents. But it had long been a goal of mine to reach 7 figure net worth on my own and I can finally say I have done so. A brief snapshot: Checking: 26K HYSA: 22K 401K: 378K Roth IRA: 196K Taxable: 353K HSA: 28K TOTAL: 1.03MM (I do not include real estate, which is about 200K equity) Backstory: I failed out of college in 2009. I blame immaturity - I was babied my whole life and moved 500 miles away. I joined a fraternity and cared way more about beer and girls than grades. My first 2 years were easy enough - but junior year came around and I was in for a rude awakening. My parents welcomed me back home with many conditions. I had a curfew, was not allowed to drink, had to ask permission to use the car, had to get a job and had to go back to school. I was so embarrassed- I was a smart kid in my high school with straight A's and now I'm bagging groceries for my friend's parents. I went to a local community college and re-took some classes in engineering. Found a groove and kept on pushing. After 3 semesters I transferred into state school and finally finished with a BS in Mechanical Engineering in 2012. I got my first job as a CAD technician getting paid 50K. Soul sucking job. Moved in with some friends at a really cheap apartment. Most of my friends made little money so we just hung out and played video games or went camping on the weekends. I started saving 15% from my very first paycheck. After a few years I wanted something else- so I figured why not try grad school. My alma matter had a Plastics Engineering program that sounded interesting. I kept working full time and taking as many classes as I could. These were dark times because I had zero social life. But I was determined not to fail again. I got my MS in Plastics Engineering in 2017. I immediately got a new job offer at 80K and amazing benefits. Free healthcare, 10% 401k matching, bonuses, ESPP - the works. Unfortunately that job only lasted 3 years until Covid hit and we were all laid off. Between unemployment and severance I came out just fine. Found a new job 3 months later and been there ever since. Currently making 125K after some raises, but benefits are much worse. How I got here Aggressive investing. I bought a lot of tech stocks and SPY. I maxed out my 401k and roth IRA from 2014 onwards. I had a net zero budget - after all my bills were paid and my e-fund funded, every dollar went into the market. I lived WAY below my means which was significantly easier a decade ago. I had roommates until 2019, as many as 5 at a time. I drove used cards until I couldnt anymore. I mostly gave up drinking so I never went out for the sake of going out. I like cooking so I made 95% of my meals at home. Packed a lunch every day. Whats next If you asked me 4 years ago, I would tell you my plan was to retire at around age 40 with 1.5MM and a paid off house in a LCOL area. That all changed when I met my now wife. Luckiest man on the planet. She brought in another ~500k into the relationship. We have a house and a dog and are now trying for kids. I am planning on taking some time off from work if/when we do as my partner's career involves significant travel. I am quite burned out and my current job is not going well. Benefit of living this 'lifestyle' is that I am not overly concerned about it. Our current combined NW is around 1.7MM. Our goal is 7MM at age 50 (15 years) - but that goal shifts every so often. Who knows what the future will bring. Thanks for listening. submitted by /u/bondsman333 [link] [comments]

  • Best place to park international allocation given 175% FPL cliff
    by /u/Moist_Young2620 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 17, 2024 at 1:28 pm

    TLDR: Given the significantly higher yield of intl and the 175% FPL cliffs for FAFSA and ACA, is it better to park your international allocation in a retirement vehicle rather than your brokerage account? Longer Version: Long time lurker. First time poster. Haven't really seen this addressed elsewhere. I am ~50% to our number and have always put my ~30% intl allocation (a drag that I've come to terms with) into our brokerage account to take advantage of the tax credit. Ultimately we'll land well into chubby but probably not the moving goalposts of fatfire. The dividend yield on our brokerage account is already about $18k which is ~35% of the 175% FPL limit for our family. Given: How beneficial it is to stay below the 175% FPL (who knows what it will be when I retire) VXUS yields about 2.4x what VTI does in dividends We're already filling up 35% of that important 175% FPL cliff We will spend say $75k more than the $54.6k 175% limit Should I be moving our future international asset allocation to some retirement vehicle? I do mean future in that I don't intend to sell the brokerage holdings but make smarter decisions moving forward. The $75k in additional spend will certainly not all be income but I imagine there is some AGI in there with capital gains and such. I intend to manipulate as best I can. Few relevant data points: $18k in brokerage dividends last year 32% federal bracket filing jointly Current asset allocation: 100% equities - 72% US, 28% Intl Account breakdown: 50% brokerage, 26% pretax, 24% roth Retirement Timeline: 8 years out assuming consistent contributions and 5% real return submitted by /u/Moist_Young2620 [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Monday, June 17, 2024
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 17, 2024 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • New job offer ($43k increase + promotion) that requires a move to a HCOL city
    by /u/CastOfSNL (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 17, 2024 at 3:57 am

    Hey all! Longtime lurker, first time poster in the sub. I've recently received a job offer from a company that would bump up my total comp from $98K a year living in a LCOL city, to $140k a year ($125k base and $15k annual bonus) that would be a promotion from my current role. The catch is that it would require me to move to a HCOL city (D.C.). I've been thinking about the pro's and con's from a FIRE perspective and from a life experience perspective, but would love any insight from others who have had a similar opportunity present itself! Please let me know if you see any glaring errors or things I should be accounting for. Other info: Single and in my mid 20's, with the hope to achieve FIRE within the next 20 years. Current job is fully remote, but the new job would be 4 days in office 1 WFH. I've been passed over for promotion in my current role and don't see a clear path to advancing my career in my current company. Currently able to save/invest roughly $3.4K a month/$40.8K annually (inclusive of 401k, taxable brokerage and adding to savings) after rent, utilities, groceries/eating out, etc. I believe I'd be able to save/invest $4.4K a month/$52.8K annually even with the increase in rent and other expenses (a $12K increase in savings/investments). Here's my current monthly budget for my LCOL city: Gross Income: $8,107 Pre Tax 401K Contribution: $1,865 Total Taxes: $1,594 Net Income: $4,648 Rent + Utilities: $1,829 Groceries + Eating out: $700 Savings/Emergency Fund: $500 Roth IRA Contribution: $500 Brokerage Contribution: $500 Miscellaneous Bills/Insurances/Gas/Etc: $600 Total Invested/Saved = $3400 ($40.8K annually) Here's my projected monthly budget for my HCOL city (D.C.) based on average rents and perceived increases (but please let me know if there's something else I should be accounting for)! Gross Income: $11,666 Pre Tax 401K Contribution: $1,867 Total Taxes: $3,087 Net Income: $6,712 Rent + Utilities: $2,520 ($2300 base rent + $220 utilities) Groceries + Eating out: $1000 (increase by $300 from LCOL to account for new experiences/costs) Savings/Emergency Fund: $500 Roth IRA Contribution: $500 Brokerage Contribution: $1500 (increase of $1000 from LCOL) Miscellaneous Bills/Insurances/Gas/Etc: $600 Total Invested/Saved = $4400 ($52.8K annually, a $12K increase) submitted by /u/CastOfSNL [link] [comments]

  • Let's talk about our dark FIRE secrets
    by /u/FireArgentina (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 16, 2024 at 11:28 pm

    In this forum there is a lot of talk about doubts, rate my plan, etc. I want to propose a different talk, what are the things you do that you know go against the entire FIRE movement, but you do them anyway? Things that if they were told in this group you would probably get downvoted to hell. Examples: risky investments (specific stocks, crypto, etc.), excessive purchases, planning a % swr greater than 4%, waiting for an inheritance, or anything else. Very intrigued to read you guys! submitted by /u/FireArgentina [link] [comments]

  • Rate my plan
    by /u/sarahbeth42 (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 16, 2024 at 7:43 pm

    I’m looking for a sanity check on whether my plan makes sense. My (37f) husband (40m) and I set a goal to both retire by the time he’s 50. We currently have $2.4M in net worth with $2.1 in investable assets spread throughout 401ks, Roth IRAs, and brokerage accounts. We own our home (location 1) but will be moving next year for his work to a HCOL location (location 2). We will plan to buy a house there and expect it will be between $900k and 1.2M. We’ll use a VA loan so don’t need to put much of a down payment, but with interest rates being high, I think it’s worth putting money down. I currently have $150k earmarked for it and expect to have ~$250k by the time we buy. Our FIRE number is $2.6 but I’d like that to be in conjunction with a paid off forever home, which will be in a third location where we don’t currently own a house. I expect the house there will cost us ~$1M. Since we’re pretty close to our FIRE number anyway, my plan is to put all of our monthly savings into a house down payment fund, and after we close on the house, put monthly savings into house principal. I expect interest will be somewhere around 6-7% by this time next year, so not a terrible return. We’ll absolutely work for the next 4 years to vest in pensions but can evaluate how much we want to work after that. The idea would be to hit our FIRE number through growth, and have enough equity in houses 1 and 2 that we can sell them and put a big down payment into house 3, then work for a year or two until it’s completely paid off. Is this a reasonable plan? Anything else I’m missing? Thanks for any additional thoughts. submitted by /u/sarahbeth42 [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Sunday, June 16, 2024
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 16, 2024 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Roth 403b vs 457
    by /u/moemastro (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 16, 2024 at 1:20 am

    I’m currently maxing out my 403b, 457, ROTH IRA and HSA. The 403b and 457 contributions I’m making now are pretax but I have the option of doing ROTH in both. I can only make ROTH contributions to one without making more life sacrifices than I’m willing to make, and it would be cutting my taxable income too close for comfort for me to qualify for a ROTH IRA instead of a backdoor ROTH. I intend on retiring early and am not sure which account (403b vs 457) ROTH contributions would be more advantageous, or if I should split it between them, or if I should just do a separate investment account. If it matters I’m 36 and hope to retire in my early 50s or earlier depending on how I feel in the future. Any advice is appreciated! submitted by /u/moemastro [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Saturday, June 15, 2024
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 15, 2024 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Reached $2 million net worth
    by /u/HeadOfUbiquitous (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on June 14, 2024 at 4:13 pm

    Long-time lurker, first-time poster, and an admirer of everyone here. My wife (41) and I (42) have reached a net worth of a little over $2 million. This is beyond my wildest dreams, and I cannot share it with anyone except anonymously here. Growing up as refugees, I never thought I could be a millionaire, let alone reach a $2 million net worth. I hope this will continue to grow to ensure we have a comfortable retirement. Our net worth breakdown is as follows: • $1.32 million (traditional 401k, with about 8% in Roth 401k) • $95k - Cash • $150k - Pension (mine) • $400k - Home equity • $46k - HSA • $80k - After-tax brokerage We also have 529 accounts and custodial accounts for our children, which are not included here as we consider this their money. We grew up not knowing anything about investing in the market and did not have any mentors. However, we were fortunate to start contributing to our 401k retirement accounts as soon as we began working professionally after receiving our undergraduate degrees, mainly as a way to reduce our tax burden. This led to our retirement accounts ballooning over the last several years with compound interest and the market reaching new heights. Additionally, we were lucky to purchase over 10 acres and build our house shortly after 2010. We hope this will be our forever home. As I mentioned, we were refugees, and we are grateful for what this country has given us. If there is ever doubt about the American dream, it is alive and well. We all just need determination, a little luck, and to avoid spending our money lavishly. Our next goal is to increase our after-tax brokerage account or diversify our investments into real estate. Any recommendations would be appreciated. Thank you for reading. submitted by /u/HeadOfUbiquitous [link] [comments]

  • The Official 2023 Survey Results Are Here
    by /u/Melonbalon (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 5, 2024 at 8:53 pm

    Mike you can stop asking because… The data for the 2023 survey is now available. Woot woot. There are multiple tabs on the sheet: • Responses: The survey results after I did some minimal clean up work. • Summary Report – All: Summary that the survey software automatically kicks out (this is what folks were seeing after taking the survey). • Statistics – All: Statistics that the survey software automatically kicks out (this is what folks were seeing after taking the survey). • Removed: Responses that I removed as either suspected duplicates or because they were almost entirely blank. • Change Log: My notes on the clean-up work I did. And if you want some history, here are the prior results. I’m also linking the old Reddit posts when I released the data, you can see the old visualizations linked in those if you’re so inclined. 2022 Survey Results/ 2022 Response Post 2021 Survey Results/ 2021 Response Post 2020 Survey Results / 2020 Response Post 2018 Survey Results / 2017 Survey Results / 2017 Response Post 2016 Survey Results / 2016 Response Post Note: The 2016 - 2018 results are partial - all respondents were able to opt in or out of being in the spreadsheet, so only those who opted in are included. 2016 also suffered from a lack of clarity in the time period responses should cover, which was corrected in later versions. And if you really want to see a blast from the past… Here’s the very first survey that was ever posted And here’s how I wound up in charge of it… And here’s what we originally all wanted to get out of this thing. Reporters/Writers: Email redditfisurvey@gmail.com or send this account a private message (not a chat) with any inquiries. submitted by /u/Melonbalon [link] [comments]


Ace the 2023 AWS Solutions Architect Associate SAA-C03 Exam with Confidence Pass the 2023 AWS Certified Machine Learning Specialty MLS-C01 Exam with Flying Colors

List of Freely available programming books - What is the single most influential book every Programmers should read



#BlackOwned #BlackEntrepreneurs #BlackBuniness #AWSCertified #AWSCloudPractitioner #AWSCertification #AWSCLFC02 #CloudComputing #AWSStudyGuide #AWSTraining #AWSCareer #AWSExamPrep #AWSCommunity #AWSEducation #AWSBasics #AWSCertified #AWSMachineLearning #AWSCertification #AWSSpecialty #MachineLearning #AWSStudyGuide #CloudComputing #DataScience #AWSCertified #AWSSolutionsArchitect #AWSArchitectAssociate #AWSCertification #AWSStudyGuide #CloudComputing #AWSArchitecture #AWSTraining #AWSCareer #AWSExamPrep #AWSCommunity #AWSEducation #AzureFundamentals #AZ900 #MicrosoftAzure #ITCertification #CertificationPrep #StudyMaterials #TechLearning #MicrosoftCertified #AzureCertification #TechBooks

Top 1000 Canada Quiz and trivia: CANADA CITIZENSHIP TEST- HISTORY - GEOGRAPHY - GOVERNMENT- CULTURE - PEOPLE - LANGUAGES - TRAVEL - WILDLIFE - HOCKEY - TOURISM - SCENERIES - ARTS - DATA VISUALIZATION
zCanadian Quiz and Trivia, Canadian History, Citizenship Test, Geography, Wildlife, Secenries, Banff, Tourism

Top 1000 Africa Quiz and trivia: HISTORY - GEOGRAPHY - WILDLIFE - CULTURE - PEOPLE - LANGUAGES - TRAVEL - TOURISM - SCENERIES - ARTS - DATA VISUALIZATION
Africa Quiz, Africa Trivia, Quiz, African History, Geography, Wildlife, Culture

Exploring the Pros and Cons of Visiting All Provinces and Territories in Canada.
Exploring the Pros and Cons of Visiting All Provinces and Territories in Canada

Exploring the Advantages and Disadvantages of Visiting All 50 States in the USA
Exploring the Advantages and Disadvantages of Visiting All 50 States in the USA


Today I Learned (TIL) You learn something new every day; what did you learn today? Submit interesting and specific facts about something that you just found out here.

Reddit Science This community is a place to share and discuss new scientific research. Read about the latest advances in astronomy, biology, medicine, physics, social science, and more. Find and submit new publications and popular science coverage of current research.

Reddit Sports Sports News and Highlights from the NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB, MLS, and leagues around the world.

Turn your dream into reality with Google Workspace: It’s free for the first 14 days.
Get 20% off Google Google Workspace (Google Meet) Standard Plan with  the following codes:
Get 20% off Google Google Workspace (Google Meet) Standard Plan with  the following codes: 96DRHDRA9J7GTN6 96DRHDRA9J7GTN6
63F733CLLY7R7MM
63F7D7CPD9XXUVT
63FLKQHWV3AEEE6
63JGLWWK36CP7WM
63KKR9EULQRR7VE
63KNY4N7VHCUA9R
63LDXXFYU6VXDG9
63MGNRCKXURAYWC
63NGNDVVXJP4N99
63P4G3ELRPADKQU
With Google Workspace, Get custom email @yourcompany, Work from anywhere; Easily scale up or down
Google gives you the tools you need to run your business like a pro. Set up custom email, share files securely online, video chat from any device, and more.
Google Workspace provides a platform, a common ground, for all our internal teams and operations to collaboratively support our primary business goal, which is to deliver quality information to our readers quickly.
Get 20% off Google Workspace (Google Meet) Business Plan (AMERICAS): M9HNXHX3WC9H7YE
C37HCAQRVR7JTFK
C3AE76E7WATCTL9
C3C3RGUF9VW6LXE
C3D9LD4L736CALC
C3EQXV674DQ6PXP
C3G9M3JEHXM3XC7
C3GGR3H4TRHUD7L
C3LVUVC3LHKUEQK
C3PVGM4CHHPMWLE
C3QHQ763LWGTW4C
Even if you’re small, you want people to see you as a professional business. If you’re still growing, you need the building blocks to get you where you want to be. I’ve learned so much about business through Google Workspace—I can’t imagine working without it.
(Email us for more codes)