10 Commandments of Options Trading Strategies

Options Trading/Strategies

This blog is about the 10 Commandments of Options Trading Strategies.

Option strategies are the simultaneous, and often mixed, buying or selling of one or more options that differ in one or more of the options’ variables. Call options, simply known as calls, give the buyer a right to buy a particular stock at that option’s strike price. Conversely, put options, simply known as puts, give the buyer the right to sell a particular stock at the option’s strike price. This is often done to gain exposure to a specific type of opportunity or risk while eliminating other risks as part of a trading strategy. A very straightforward strategy might simply be the buying or selling of a single option; however, option strategies often refer to a combination of simultaneous buying and or selling of options.

Options strategies allow traders to profit from movements in the underlying assets based on market sentiment (i.e., bullish, bearish or neutral). In the case of neutral strategies, they can be further classified into those that are bullish on volatility, measured by the lowercase Greek letter sigma (σ), and those that are bearish on volatility. Traders can also profit off time decay, measured by the uppercase Greek letter theta (Θ), when the stock market has low volatility. The option positions used can be long and/or short positions in calls and puts.

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Below are the 10 Commandments of Options Trading:

  • Thou shall always take 100% daily gains or 200% all time gains.
  • Do not fall into temptation and buy during the first 30 minutes of market open. (Selling positions is still permitted)
  • Thou shall not buy calls on green days.
  • Thou shall not buy puts on red days.
  • Avoid greed and do not buy consecutive options on 1 company.
  • Give thyself at least 3 weeks time to play the option.
  • End your suffering and sell if down 50% all time on an option play.
  • Avoid gluttony and do not day trade options. (Swing trades allowed)
  • Be fruitful, multiply earnings and sell covered calls if holding any.
  • Celebrate and binge drink after big gains (or losses)
  • Off topic, but relevant – You absolutely need to be doing a 401k or IRA as well as investing in crypto: 401ks and IRAs offer fantastic tax advantages that straight investing does not. Also if you have an employer who matches you are leaving money on the table by not taking advantage of that. It’s foolish. Crypto is great and should definitely be in your portfolio but it should not be your whole portfolio.
    Sources:
    1- WallStreetBets
    2- Wikipedia

Finance and Binance Breaking News – Top Stories

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  • Daily Discussion Thread for May 26, 2022
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    Read rules, follow Twitter and IG, join Discord, see ban bets! submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Thursday, May 26, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 26, 2022 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

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  • SEA OF RED AT THE OPEN TOMORROW?
    by /u/3xinvesting (wallstreetbets) on May 26, 2022 at 12:13 am

    Tomorrow we will find out the QoQ GDP number for Q1, which will of course be negative. Many people are talking as if a recession is not on the horizon, but in fact we may very well be already in one. We won’t find out officially until July when we get the GDP numbers for Q2. Tomorrow the weekly initial jobless claims number will also be released premarket. This number has been higher than forecast three consecutive weeks, and with rates rising there will inevitably be slowdowns as some cracks are already forming. Any company that has debt is facing Fed-induced headwinds, and will continue to face them. Many companies are already slashing revenue forecasts. Initial claims rising are a sure sign we are heading for challenging times ahead and corporations are taking early action. This is another sign of the rough future that lies ahead for equity markets over the foreseeable future. With both QoQ GDP and Initial Claims released premarket, odds are looking like a sea of red at the open. This group's membership is growing day by day which is another confirmation that more people are becoming unemployed and unemployable. You can't return to the workforce for a salary that you tripled and lost in a week. ​ https://preview.redd.it/fbyvl0yvpp191.png?width=1093&format=png&auto=webp&s=956cf38545bd871c91100a1fe348f6374a3bc18d submitted by /u/3xinvesting [link] [comments]

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    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 25, 2022 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly Self-Promotion Thread - May 25, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 25, 2022 at 9:00 am

    Self-promotion (ie posting about projects/businesses that you operate and can profit from) is typically a practice that is discouraged in /r/financialindependence, and these posts are removed through moderation. This is a thread where those rules do not apply. However, please do not post referral links in this thread. Use this thread to talk about your blog, talk about your business, ask for feedback, etc. If the self-promotion starts to leak outside of this thread, we will once again return to a time where 100% of self-promotion posts are banned. Please use this space wisely. Link-only posts will be removed. Put some effort into it. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Diversifying Vested Company Stock vs Holding Analysis
    by /u/drenader (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 24, 2022 at 9:54 pm

    As a devout index funder on my journey to FIRE I have nearly always instantly sold my FB shares as soon as they vested and diversified into index funds (VTI or VTSAX). But man did I still have that FOMO. Especially when I saw FB pass $350, all I could think about was my initial grant of $66 shares. I had always still wanted to know "What if I never sold". So I created a Google Sheet which answers just that. You can input your vests into a private copy and it will show you how diversification vs holding fared. Want to calculate this for yourself? Make a copy of my RSU Hold vs Diversification Google Sheet and update it with your personal vests. Output Example My Facebook Shares For my personal situation FB shares had out performed the index fund strategy by ~20% for most of the last 8 years. But the past few months have had things swing the other direction with the diversification yielding a 20% higher total value. I ran the same scenario for my wife's pre-ipo Uber shares and the diversification strategy would have yielded >30% more (before dividends). submitted by /u/drenader [link] [comments]

  • A (Synthetic) Gen Xer's Savings and Retirement Experience.
    by /u/alcesalcesalces (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 24, 2022 at 9:22 pm

    Edit: If you don't like the idea of someone making 64k in 1989, cut all numbers in half. Imagine someone making 32k, saving 12k/yr, spending 20k in retirement on a 500k portfolio, etc. All conclusions will be the same, merely the face value of the dollar amounts would be cut in half. Why did I choose 64k? Because it leaves 40k behind after arbitrarily choosing 24k to save. The 40k number—and the $1M FIRE number that flows out of that—have resonance in this subreddit and make the raw numbers more intuitive to a 2020s audience. Edit: I have included numbers cut in half (in italic parentheses) for those who state the 64k number is unrealistic. Again, none of the conclusions of the post are different as a result of dividing by 2. Intro We each only have one life, but I think it can be instructive to imagine yourself in other contexts to evaluate how those situations make you feel so you may be better prepared to handle them if they happen to you. To that end, I wanted to explore a particular hypothetical Gen Xer's experience. Someone who started saving in 1989 saw a particularly difficult set of returns at key points in their investing journey. All values are inflation-adjusted and include reinvestment of dividends. For simplicity, taxes are omitted. Saving for Retirement Imagine someone born in 1969 who gets their first real job in January 1989 making $64,000 (use $32,000 if you think $64,000 is unrealistic, the conclusions are unchanged) in 1989 terms. This person saves $24,000 ($12,000) each year, with an inflation adjustment, allowing them to spend the remaining $40,000 ($20,000). Using the 4% rule of thumb, they set a FIRE target of $1M ($500k) in 1989 terms. It took this saver a little over 23 years (32k graph) to reach this target (source). There are a few things to note: The saver gets this close to the target in October 2007, but in hindsight is perhaps relieved they did not retire then. In February 2009, the saver's portfolio is worth $486,299 ($243,151, discrepancy due to rounding) after having put $484,000 ($242,000) of contributions into the account. After 20 years of investing, the saver's portfolio is worth only $2,299 ($1,151) more than their total contributions to date. Stop and think about that for a second. You diligently save for 20 years and end up just one month of contributions ahead of where you'd have been if you had gotten zero real return. If anything in the financial world is discouraging, this is it. Having seen this, my mind immediately turned to prior work examining de-risking with bonds as your portfolio gets close to your FIRE number in order to reduce the impact of a market crash as you get close to your number. Let's say the saver takes this to heart and decides that once they hit 70% of their FIRE number, they'll rapidly shift their portfolio to their retirement asset allocation of 60% stocks and 40% bonds. For this retiree, this event happens right at the end of 1999 (32k income graph), which in hindsight is very nice timing regarding what happened in the early 2000s. If we take a look at the path of $703,731 ($351,868, again, rounding) dollars invested at the beginning of 2000 (with $2000/mo [$1000/mo] continued contributions), we can see that the de-risked portfolio hits $1M ($500k) at the end of May 2007 (500k graph) (source). (As an internal control, we can see that the 100% stock portfolio hits $1M ($500k) at the same timepoint as before, early 2012). Using timely de-risking of the portfolio, the retiree hits their FIRE number about 5 years sooner than if they had kept a 100% stock portfolio. Spending in Retirement The good news: the de-risked saver gets to retire 5 years earlier! The bad news: it's in mid-2007. We all know what's around the corner for this 38-year-old retiree. For simplicity of comparison, this next section assumes retirement at the beginning of 2007 and that the retiree was somehow able to get $1M ($500k) exactly regardless of their portfolio type. Let's now compare three different approaches: a 100% stock portfolio with a 4% withdrawal, a 60/40% portfolio with a 4% withdrawal, and a 60/40% portfolio using Variable Percentage Withdrawal. When comparing 100% stock to the 60/40% portfolio, the latter has certainly had a smoother experience since 2007 ($500k graph) (source). At the beginning of 2009, the 60/40% retiree is withdrawing around 5.2% of the remaining portfolio value at that time compared to 6.7% for the 100% stock retiree. It's been a hair-raising experience for the 100% stock retiree, and the SWR-style of withdrawals gives no explicit guidance for whether and how much to cut back during bad years. Similarly, the 100% stock retiree doesn't get any instruction on whether or when it's safe to increase their spending to take advantage of some clear growth in the portfolio in the late 2010s. Let's look now at the experience of the VPW retiree with a 60/40% portfolio. They input a $2000/mo ($1000/mo) social security payment coming when they are age 70, which roughly matches the inflation-adjusted payout of someone working from 1989 to 2006 making an inflation-adjusted $64,000 ($32,000) (1989 dollars) through their career. Starting in 2007, the VPW Worksheet tells them to withdraw $45,817 ($22908, rounding) from their portfolio. This is a substantial benefit over the $40,000 ($20,000) the SWR-style retiree takes (15% more!), but it comes with a downside. The retiree needs to be prepared for a reduction in spending to at least $32,415 ($16,207, rounding) in the event of a market crash. Recall that in the parallel universe of SWR-style withdrawals, this retiree was willing to take only $40,000 ($20,000) from the $1M ($500k) portfolio. So a required flexibility down to $32,000 ($16,000) represents a 20% haircut from that level of spending. I don't know about you, but I think that having a discretionary spending amount of 20% of my overall spending is eminently reasonable. When we track what happens over time (500k chart), we can see that the market crash of 2008-9 truly did have a substantial impact on spending during that time. For a few years, the retiree is spending less than $40,000 ($20,000) and at the beginning of 2009 they're taking a $35,041 ($17,521, rounding) withdrawal from a portfolio that's fallen to $739,252 ($369,626) (4.7%). While certainly no fun, they are still enjoying around $3,000 ($1,500) of discretionary spending above their starting "flexibility" number of $32,000 ($16,000). More tellingly, their total amount spent over the 15 full years since retirement has been $698,734 ($349,367) compared to the $600,000 ($300,000) spent by the SWR-style retirees. That is to say, the VPW retiree has gotten to spend 16% more than the SWR-style retiree over this period. Conclusions Bad market returns can make a mockery of even the most diligent buy-and-hold, day-in-day-out investor. Someone investing periodically from 1989 to the bottom of 2009 saw almost zero real return on their investment despite taking no breaks in their investing behavior and doing all the right things. De-risking the portfolio near your FIRE number can substantially mitigate the impact of a market crash on your FIRE timeline, saving 5 years of work for this particular retiree. Retiring at a bad time can significantly increase the stress of retiring using SWR-style approaches. Even conservative allocations like 60/40% can lead to uncomfortably high withdrawal rates. If one is able to tolerate a reasonable amount of variability in their spending, Variable Percentage Withdrawal can provide substantial upside in the (probable) case that the market provides high returns in the long run that cause the portfolio to grow substantially. submitted by /u/alcesalcesalces [link] [comments]

  • Ukraine's banking sector increases losses as war rages
    by /u/Motor-Ad-8858 (Financial news and views) on May 24, 2022 at 10:36 am

    submitted by /u/Motor-Ad-8858 [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Tuesday, May 24, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 24, 2022 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Moronic Monday - May 24, 2022 - Your Weekly Questions Thread
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial news and views) on May 24, 2022 at 2:00 am

    This is your safe place for questions on financial careers, homework problems and finance in general. No question in the finance domain is unwelcome. Replies are expected to be constructive and civil. Any questions about your personal finances belong in r/PersonalFinance, and career-seekers are encouraged to also visit r/FinancialCareers. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • HSBC suspends banker over 'nut job' climate comments, say reports
    by /u/newzee1 (Financial news and views) on May 23, 2022 at 1:50 pm

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  • Daily FI discussion thread - Monday, May 23, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 23, 2022 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly “Help Me FIRE!” thread. Post your detailed information for highly specific advice - May 23, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 23, 2022 at 9:01 am

    Need help applying broader FIRE principles to your own situation? We’re here for you! Post your detailed personal “case study” and ask as many questions as you like, or help others who’ve done the same. Not sure if your questions pertain? Post them anyway…you might be surprised. It’ll be helpful to use our suggested format. Simply copy/paste/fill in/etc. But since everybody’s situation is different, feel free to tailor your layout to your needs. -Introduce yourself -Age / Industry / Location -General goals -Target FIRE Age / Amount / Withdrawal Rate / Location -Educational background and plans -Career situation and plans -Current and future income breakdown, including one-time events -Budget breakdown -Asset breakdown, including home, cars, etc. -Debt breakdown -Health concerns -Family: current situation / future plans / special needs / elderly parents -Other info -Questions? submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Weekly FI Monday Milestone thread - May 23, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 23, 2022 at 9:00 am

    Please use this thread to post your milestones, humblebrags and status updates which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • A superstar investor with the Midas touch or just lucky? The puzzle of Cathie Wood
    by /u/GoMx808-0 (Financial news and views) on May 22, 2022 at 11:09 pm

    submitted by /u/GoMx808-0 [link] [comments]

  • Perspective on market corrections
    by /u/Darwynne (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 22, 2022 at 3:36 pm

    I did this analysis for a post in the daily thread, but I think it's valuable enough to not be buried there. Yes, the S&P has fallen 17% from its all time high. But thinking about that as a portfolio "loss" from an over-inflated high exaggerates the impact: Starting from the peak overstates the losses. At the end of 2021 the S&P had doubled in 5 years. That's a 15% annualized return. The current correction has taken us down to an 11% annualized return from the same starting date (12/1/2016). Picking an arbitrary starting date, 1/1/1995, the S&P was up 20.5% (annualized) by the 2000 peak, and bottomed out at 7.5% in February 2003. It was back up to 10% in 2007. It did fall to 3.5% in March 2009 but was only below 4% for one month. Currently we've fallen from a recent peak of 9.0% to 8.1%. This really isn't a big deal for a long term portfolio, especially if you keep several years of spending money in a lower risk investment. The over-inflated high was exciting, but not ours to keep, so there aren't really losses to recover. submitted by /u/Darwynne [link] [comments]

  • Daily FI discussion thread - Sunday, May 22, 2022
    by /u/AutoModerator (Financial Independence / Retire Early) on May 22, 2022 at 9:02 am

    Please use this thread to have discussions which you don't feel warrant a new post to the sub. While the Rules for posting questions on the basics of personal finance/investing topics are relaxed a little bit here, the rules against memes/spam/self-promotion/excessive rudeness/politics still apply! Have a look at the FAQ for this subreddit before posting to see if your question is frequently asked. Since this post does tend to get busy, consider sorting the comments by "new" (instead of "best" or "top") to see the newest posts. submitted by /u/AutoModerator [link] [comments]

  • Inflating Equity: Inflation’s Impact on Financial Statements and ROE
    by /u/Hurbahns (Financial news and views) on May 21, 2022 at 5:09 pm

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  • Most Anticipated Earnings Releases for the week beginning May 23rd, 2022
    by /u/bigbear0083 (wallstreetbets) on May 21, 2022 at 11:34 am

    submitted by /u/bigbear0083 [link] [comments]