Programming Languages used for Autopilot in Self Driving Cars like Tesla, Audi, BMW, Mercedes Benz, Volvo, Infiniti

Self Driving Cars Programming language - Misra C

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Most self-driving cars on the market today use C programming language for their vehicle software. This is because C is a very robust and stable language that can be trusted for mission-critical applications. In addition, C is relatively easy to learn and has a wide range of features that make it well suited for automotive applications. However, there are some drawbacks to using C for self-driving cars. First, it is not a very concise language, so the code can be quite long and difficult to read. Second, C does not have built-in support for object-oriented programming, which is becoming increasingly important in the world of autonomous vehicles. As a result, many carmakers are starting to explore other languages for their autopilot systems, such as Java and Python.

Below are Top Cars with AutoPilot features for 2022:

  • Tesla (Model 3, Y, S & X)
  • GM – (Cadillac CT6, Cadillac Escalade, Chevy Bolt, Hummer EV)
  • Audi (A6, A8)
  • BMW (X5, 3 Series )
  • Ford / Lincoln (Mustang Mach-E, Ford F-150)
  • Kia / Hyundai (Telluride, Palisade, Sonata)
  • Mercedes Benz (E-Class, S-Class)
  • Volvo (XC90, XC60, XC40)
  • Nissan (Rogue, Leaf, etc.)
  • Infiniti (QX50)

Whilst it’s technically correct that Tesla most likely uses the C programming language for their vehicle software, it’s worth clarifying that the actual language would be MISRA C which has several constraints on the language to provide better control over its features .

Low-level communication requires using C. Especially for embedded systems, sensors and IoT software.

To develop software for supporting devices in the system C++ is the best option.

However, Python is the language to enter the game when it comes to using AI.

WHY DOES ELON HATE LIDAR?

There are a few reasons for that:

  1. Lidar uses light to measure distances. But we know you can measure distances using a “stereo pair” of regular cameras with (by 2020 standards) very simple software processing.
  2. Lidar requires mechanical scanning of the scene – implying moving parts that will make it less reliable.
  3. Lidar sensors are quite costly compared to cameras. A digital camera costs less than $1 in quantity. Lidar units are in the hundred to several hundred dollar range.
  4. Radar and ultrasound both do a lot of what Lidar does – they are cheaper, and because they’re operating outside of the spectrum of visible light, they can see things that cameras and Lidar can’t – so they add more value than Lidar.
  5. Lidar does have a few odd “artifacts” – some objects don’t reflect light very well – very shiny objects reflect it only in a narrow direction that doesn’t return the light to the Lidar sensor. Processing to eliminate these artifacts is comparable in complexity to the stereo-camera solution.
  6. Lidar can’t REPLACE cameras – so you still need them for image recognition. For example, you can’t read the wording on a road sign using Lidar.

Activities – MISRA C

  • Waymo (previously Google) are using much more clever sophistication – and having a wider variety of sensors helps them. But with only a small number of actual cars collecting driving data – training an AI is tough. They’ve only driven about 20 million miles with their test cars.
  • Tesla are using brute force AI. They’ve invested in a massively powerful AI computer in each car (two of them, actually) – and a billion dollar data center for processing AI learning. With a million cars collecting data for them, they can collect a BILLION miles of training data every month.

With the Tesla approach, less is more.

With the Waymo approach, sophistication is king – and the more data you can get from your sensors, the less processing you have to do.

Reference

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Programming languages are used for Autopilot in Self Driving Cars. These cars have software that uses the C programming language. The MISRA C standard is important for the quality of this software. There are some core features of Autopilot, such as adaptive cruise control, lane centering, and autonomous parking. Some cars also have other advanced features that add to the convenience of the driver. Drivers can get these features by either buying a car with them included or by installing aftermarket Autopilot systems. Programming languages are also used for other purposes in these cars. For example, some companies use different languages to develop their infotainment systems or autonomous driving systems. Additionally, some companies have open-source projects for their vehicle software where they allow anyone to contribute code. Programming languages are thus an integral part of self-driving cars.

To conclude:

Programming languages are used to give instructions to a computer. High-level programming languages are easier for humans to read and write than low-level languages, which are closer to machine code. Programming languages can be compiled or interpreted. A Compiled language is converted into machine code that the computer can understand before the program is run. An interpreted language is read by a software program called an interpreter, which then converts it into machine code that the computer can understand. Some programming languages are more suited to certain tasks than others. For example, FORTRAN is often used for scientific or engineering applications because its syntax is designed to produce code that is easy to read and understand. Finding the right programming language can be a challenging task for any programmer. When it comes to writing software for self-driving cars, there are a few important factors to consider. First, the language must be able to handle the large amounts of data that self-driving cars generate. Second, it must be able to handle the real-time processing requirements of autonomous vehicles. And third, it must be able to meet the safety requirements of the automotive industry.

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Related:

I doubt it could operate well in the complete absence of light, but that situation can not arise. And it works extremely well in at least one very difficult seeing situation. Let me relate my experience.

On our recent road trip from San Diego to Clinton, Iowa, it was near dark as we reached the city limits of Clinton. Just as we did it started to rain heavily. A few seconds later the sky opened up and the heavy rain became what we call in Iowa, a Gully Washer. I was using Navigate on Autopilot, driving on the main road which led to the side street where our hotel destination was situated. I could see through the windshield by watching a 2 inch wide strip of cleared glass created as the windshield wiper passed back and forth. Other cars kept going and as I couldn’t see the road, I followed the car ahead of me. (Autopilot made that much easier than trying to stop as it even kept within the lane pretty much.) I could not see but I guess the cameras on the bumper below the headlights could see well enough. When the navigator told me to turn left in 200 feet, I couldn’t do that because I couldn’t see at all out the side window or the corner of the windshield. That is, nothing but flowing water, so I continued, to which Autopilot directed me to make a U-turn. On returning to the intersection of my turn, I caught a glimpse of a street sign and so, moving very slowly, turned around the sign. Water was flowing at least 6″ deep across the intersection but after a 50 or 100 feet, the crown of the road emerged and I realized that the rain was letting up.

We made it to the hotel parking lot which was full, shoes soaked getting into the door, and after checking in, waited the storm out which didn’t take long.

The point of this whole story is that the Tesla Autopilot will never have the opportunity to operate in the dark. The headlights provide enough light for the autopilot which can (in this case) see much better than a human driver. And if the battery is down to where the lights go out, I doubt the car will drive very far anyway.

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Autopilot-like functions are becoming more and more mainstream as technology improves. By late 2022, most car manufacturers will be offering some sort of more advanced self-driving capabilities.

What’s Important to Know When Evaluating

When evaluating autopilot-like self driving systems, the main thing to look out for is Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) and whether it handles starting and stopping at all speeds and on what kinds of roads. Then learn how well the vehicle can identify roads and stay in the center of the lane, called Lane Centering. Most manufacturers tout “Lane Keeping Assist” (LKA) as a way to help automate steering, but that’s different from Lane Centering and often a far cry from something like Tesla’s Autopilot system or Cadillac’s Super Cruise that are able to stay steadily centered in the lanes while driving.

If you’re not sure, check out videos on YouTube – enthusiasts and professionals often test out the systems to provide their opinions and real-world examples.

Also, ask the dealer how the system can be updated since technology and software changes so quickly. In Tesla’s case, the Autopilot system is continually updated over-the-air with software updates. Most other auto manufacturers require the updates to occur at the dealer during regular service updates.

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Is it better economically to run a car into the ground before buying a new one? Data driven answer

Old car or new car

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Is it better to drive your car into the ground before buying a new one? You might think that’s an odd question, but there’s some logic to it. We all know cars are expensive, and many people feel they have to buy a new one as soon as theirs starts to show its age. But is that really the best way to go? Let’s take a closer look at the numbers.

It might be more economical to run your car into the ground before buying a new one. Sure, you’ll have to deal with a few mechanical problems along the way, but at least you won’t have to worry about depreciation costs. Plus, you’ll get the added bonus of being able to tell your friends and family that you’re driving a “classic.”

The advice I’ve always had (and followed) is that you should always EITHER:

  1. Buy a new car – keep it for 3 years – then trade it for a new one….OR…
  2. Buy a new car and keep it until it goes to the car crusher.

Let’s see how economics work out with an actual example…

WE’RE GOING TO NEED SOME DATA:

This graph must depend a bit on make and model – but it’s probably a good average:

Looking at that graph you’re going to pay about…

  • $2,100 on maintenance over the first 5 years
  • $5,150 in the next 5
  • $8,800 in the next 5
  • $10,300 in the last 5.

For depreciation:

(15% seems kinda optimistic…but depending on the kind of car you buy – it might be OK)

When you look at your car payments – if you finance over 5 years then for a cheap $25,000 new car (A Camry or an Acura or something similar)…you’ll have somewhere around a $500 monthly loan payment over 60 months – so you’re actually paying $30,000 for the car – the rest being interest on the loan.

  • So in the first 5 years you spend $30,000 on payments and $2,100 on maintenance for a total of $32,100.
    • If you sell after 5 years: with depreciation – you get $10,000 back from selling the car – so it cost you $22,100 to have a car for 5 years…or $4,420 per year.
  • After 10 years, you spent $32,100 so far plus another $5,150 in maintenance for a total of $38,250.
    • If you sell after 10 years: you’ll get about $4,500 back so $33,750 to have a car for 10 years…or $3,375 per year.
  • After 15 years, you spend $38,250 so far plus another $8,800 in maintenance for a total of $47,050.
    • If you sell after 15 years: you’ll maybe get $2,000 – so $45,050 to have a car for 15 years…or $3,000 per year.
  • After 20 years, you spent $47,050 so far – plus $10,300 in maintenance (eek!) for a total of $57,350.
    • Nobody will buy your PoS car now – but on the plus side, the breaker’s yard will probably tow it for free – so $57,350 to have a car for 20 years…for a total of $2,867 per year.

So the cost to own a car per year (on average) is the least if you keep it until it goes to the car crusher.

This is where that original claim comes from – and it’s true.

WHAT IF YOU SELL AFTER JUST THREE YEARS?

  • Car payments are now $750/month over 36 months (MUCH higher than financing over 5 years!) – so you pay $27,000 in total (not much less than the $30,000 you’d have paid over 5 years!). But depreciation means that the car is now worth $15,000 and maintenance is zero. So you spent $12,000 over 3 years – which is $4,000 per year.

…which is LESS per year than keeping the car for 5 years.

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PARTIAL CONCLUSION:

These numbers are VERY approximate – maybe you buy a more expensive car and it depreciates faster – maybe you find a crazy reliable car and nurse it along to 25 years. Maybe engine and transmission failure happen simultaneously at year 15 and it goes to the crusher early.

But if we look at my scenario…which is based on industry norms if you swap your car out every 5 years, it’s going to cost you $4420 per year and if you keep it for 20 years, it’s costing you $2,867 per year. So on strict economic terms you should always run your car into the ground.

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However, the difference between $4000/year (swap your car every 3 years) and $2867/year is $1133/year or $94 per month.

You could not pay me $94/month to spend most of my life driving crapped out wrecks compared to driving an almost new car all the time.

Just the time I’d spend fritzing around trying to get my 20 year old car to start on a cold, damp morning isn’t worth $94/month.

IMHO – THIS WHOLE EXERCISE IS KINDA SILLY:

People who can afford to buy a new car are not going to worry too much about $94/month to keep replacing it. It’s not that big of a deal.

People who live close to paycheck-to-paycheck probably can’t (and certainly SHOULDN’T) buy a new car to begin with – and in that case, buying a car that’s already done most of it’s depreciation is a much smarter tactic.

If you can’t afford a new car – buy a 5 year old car – for less than half price. Your maintenance costs will be twice what a new car costs – but that’s peanuts compared to a full car payment.

FINAL THOUGHT: THE STEVE JOBS APPROACH:

Steve Jobs famously replaced his car every six months – with an identical car each time. He actually had a standing order with the car dealership – so he didn’t even have to think about it – they’d just drive to his house or his office with a new car and drive away the “old” one.

For years he drove a long run of black Porsche 911’s but did switch to a long number of black Mercedes SL55s.

But this is madness! A car loses 10% of it’s value during the first 20 feet as you back it out of the parking space at the dealership!

But the Steve Jobs story is weirder:

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In California, you don’t need a proper license plate for 180 days – you can drive on the temporary dealership plates, so by swapping out his cars every 6 months, he never had to go to the DMV to pick up his replacement plate. Looking at how much his time was worth – that wasn’t such a dumb idea. Jobs was earning upwards of $100 million per year – that’s $50,000 an hour. Going to the DMV for an hour cost him MUCH more than replacing the car!

This seems like a stupid story – but there is an underlying message here. While we look at those ever increasing maintenance costs over years of car ownership – each one comes with a penalty in time and stress.

In later years, the car probably breaks down – or won’t start – and you’d have to get it to a mechanic and sit around for an hour or two (or even be without a car for a few days) while you get it fixed.

How much do you value your time? $5/hour? $50/hour?

When you factor THAT in – then having a worry-free effortless new car can easily be worth the cost of swapping it out every 3 years.


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Source: Steve Baker

Top 20 Comments:

1- Or buy a 3 year old Japanese (or nowadays a Korean would do) car, having let someone else take the bulk of the depreciation, and run it on a shoestring for the next 15 years, when it’s more likely the driver will clap out before the car does.

2- Everyone says this but when I tried to do it I couldn’t find one. It seemed like the only people selling 2–3 year old cars were rental agencies. Is it worth the risk of buying a former rental? I didn’t but it could be totally fine I guess.

3- Rental companies sell their cars early so they don’t have to maintain them very well. The people who rent them also don’t drive them gently – because they don’t care. So buying a rental car seems like a bad idea.

4-

Seems to me there are some significant things you have ignored or just plain got wrong. You say it’s only $94/month difference between 3 year ownership and 20 year ownership but doesn’t your calculation require that you only pay $25,000 every 3 years when you replace your car? Does that mean you have to keep buying less expensive cars or did you just ignore increasing prices because it didn’t fit with your conclusion?

What about other costs which would be less with an older car, for example insurance and excise taxes, if applicable where you live. Also depending on where you live there may be significant sales tax due every time you buy a new car

I don’t expect your analysis to be perfect or all encompassing but I think you have substantially understated the cost differential of owning a car for 3 years vs 20 years

5- The model is simplified. In the real world, most of those variables are unknowns with a heap of “it depends”. Car prices and maintenance/parts are both impacted by inflation, but that effect can be completely dominated by supply/demand issues specific to the item in question, e.g. they stop making a specific part, your particular vehicle increases in popularity; or the old car has lower insurance, but new car has better gas mileage, etc.

6-Yeah – you can NEVER know for sure. My simplified model makes it easier to discuss and think about the consequences of depreciation versus maintenance. In reality, you need to check how the car you’re buying depreciates – and what it costs to maintain. Once you know that – you can run through the same thought processes that I did and deduce what is right in your situation.

A HUGE part of this is how many miles you drive – depreciation is a mix of mileage and age.

7- I don’t understand why all the maintenance is needed. I ran a Toyota Prius till it was 14 years old and I spent around £350 a year on maintenance including servicing. I’ve just bought a 3 year old Honda Jazz that I fully expect to run for another 10 years at similar yearly costs. Drive it gently and keep under the speed limit.

8- That graph comes from a statistical analysis of what an average car needs. There are always going to be a few people who do better than that – and a few that do a hell of a lot worse.

So your anecdotal one-off proves nothing.

9- Looks like the maintenance costs are too inflated for older cars. If one needs to put in 10000 dollars in maintenance a year, it is time to let this car go. But I’ve see enough examples when cars were running for 10 years or more with just basic maintenance, not needing a new transmission or any major repairs. Good strategy could be to buy a 2–5 year old car for a fraction of a new car cost, and then run it into ground.

10- I drive Toyota Corollas. Exclusively. The one I have now is a 2017 and it cost me $17,000. Had 11,000 miles on it when I got it. Paid off in 18 months. Almost nothing to maintain except oil changes, new brakes, and one set of tires so far. Goal is to get 300,000 miles out of her like I did the previous ones. I will drive it until the wheels fall off. Or the air conditioning breaks. I do live in the South.

11- Very well thought out. I came to the conclusion that I am in the switch out every 3 year category now. The peace of mind of always having a warranty is worth it if you can afford it in my humble opinion.

12- One major point to add. The hot-potato risk of a major service issue can greatly accelerate the crusher date, and those last 10 years can be a toss up, fix or crush.

13-

I think your maintenance figures are too high. But, using your own figures exactly:

Buy at 5 years, keep another 15: ((10000+(10300-2100))/15 = $1213/year

Buy at 10 years, keep another 10: (4500+(10300-5150))/10 = $965/year

Buy at 15 years, keep another 5: (2000+(10300-8800))/5 = $700/year

I bought my previous car here in NZ, a 1997 Subaru Outback, in 2012 for US$2.5k, and sold it in 2019 for $600 (22 yr old). There was very little maintenance. I replaced the head gaskets in the same year I got it (planned). $2k? At some point the AC started leaking and it took a couple of refills to find and fix the leaks (first refill with a dye included, so the leaks could be seen before the 2nd refill). No biggie. $500 total? In 2018 something seized in the brakes on one wheel and started dragging. Again, a couple hundred bucks to fix. Aside from that, just regular servicing.

My current car is a 2008 Outback, bought in May 2020 for US$6k with 54,000 miles. So far the only unscheduled thing is a $15 A/C control relay. Beautiful car. Limited 2000 unit production Subaru 50th anniversary model. 265 HP STI turbo engine (0–60 in 5 seconds), “Touring” cabin spec, modern safety features such as dynamic cruise control, pre-collision braking, lane departure warning (in 2008!). Going to keep this thing a long long time. 富士重工業株式会社 ニュースリリース | ニュースリリース | 株式会社SUBARU(スバル)

14-I enjoy your answers Steve:)

The only exception to that I’ve experienced is buying a used electric vehicle. I purchased a very low mile (13k) 3 year old EV lease return and have had zero maintenance on it except for tires. I spent 9k on it still have it. It was paid off early because of the savings and I could probably get around 5k for it at 10y/o. Of course whoever has to replace the battery would get that cost so it might break even using your calculations. I plan to run it into the ground including using it as a storage battery for my off grid solar.

15- My wife and I are leasing a vehicle at the moment. It’s probably the best decision we’ve made regarding transportation. We drive a new car for three years, the dealer pays for all major maintenance while we only pay for oil changes and when the time is up, we give it back and get a new one. We pay one fixed monthly price for a reliable, safe and more fuel efficient vehicle. This actually costs us less than when we drove a used vehicle that would break down randomly throughout the year and would require expensive repairs, not to mention days without a vehicle. Still, people try to tell me how I’m a sucker because I went to the dealership. But the dollars don’t lie: I save far more money doing it this way. Unless of course I am going to steal all of my new vehicles. That would be a lot cheaper, until I was caught at least!

16- I like answers like this with real figures. They give sense of scale and change so nice one!

Side note is RVs or motorhomes, as called in UK, have weirder curve. As highly customized from new much steeper curve over first 3 years. Then long time flat up to 15 years. Then kind of afterlife up to 25 years.

Why excited about Tesla Truck, if ever happens. With RV conversion could last forever.

17- For me it is also stressful to spend time looking for a new car. Trying different models, find a good deal, compromising on this and that. Some people like this part, but I don’t.

So for me the optimum is to get rid of it before the stress occasionally bad news from the mechanics.

Ans: Find one brand/type that you like and stick to it. I owned 7 MINI Coopers in a row. The only decision each time was what color do I want this time?

I’ve now switched to Tesla as my go-to-brand – but I’ll do the same. However, the depreciation curve for Tesla’s is much more gentle – and they need almost no maintenance – and will likely last for 500,000 miles, not 200,000. So I won’t be replacing them every 3 or so years. Probably every 5? We’ll see. Right now, my 3 year old Tesla is worth $2,000 MORE than I paid for it…and is indistinguishable from a brand new Tesla. So there’s no way I’m replacing it right now.

18- In my experience, it’s only worthwhile for people to keep their cars until they have paid off the financing – assuming you haven’t done something stupid like financed over 72-84 months. If you need to do that to keep the payments down, you couldn’t afford the car in the first place.

Beyond that, it only makes sense to keep old vehicles if you are able to repair them yourself. In my case, since I do 90% of the post-warranty repair work on cars I own, I buy vehicles intending to keep them until they disintegrate into a pile of brown powder out there in the yard. My current vehicles are 7, 20, 22, and 23 years old. In the past 3 years I’ve sold off other cars I owned that were 21 and 18 years old.

19-

Interesting analysis, but I think that your data on depreciation is too dramatic.

None suffer 50% depreciation after only 5 years, and in fact some hardly suffer 20% after 5 years. Certainly, 15% per year is too much.

 
 
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19- These monetary and time cost are virtually worthless. I have never purchased a new car for my own use for decades and have never incurred those types of maintenance expenses. I have always had nice cars. My last was an awesome Lincoln Mark VIII and my current is a very nice Silverado crew cab. My wife always insist on a new car. They have constantly been in the shop for scheduled maintenance and odd issues that pop up and the dealers can’t seem to resolve. German cars seem to really rack up annual maintenance cost, and dealing with their service departments is a lesson in extortion.

 

Her current vehicle is a Ram Big Horn with an A/C system that has a slow leak they cannot seem to fix and a bizarre wind noise that is also elusive. It’s under warranty, but constant trips to the dealership are a constant hassle. All while my 2007 Silverado Classic just rolls right along without any problems.

20- Beautiful analysis. Very insightful thank you. So one question? If the vehicle/truck is used to create dinero, then these stats obviously go out the window correct? Not trying to take away your analysis which is great. Just thought I would add this little wrench in the engine…no pun intended:-)

What car would be the optimal balance between affordability, speed, exoticness and parts availability?

A VW Golf would be cheap and parts would be readily available, but it would hardly be exotic or particularly fast.

Conversely, something like, say, a Lamborghini Diablo SV would undoubtedly be fast and exotic, but running the thing and replacing parts would be horribly costly and difficult.

What car ticks a balanced box between all these?

Consensus is:
– if in the US, a C4-C7 Corvette, preferably a Z06 or ZR1

Engines are cheap and easy to modify, can pull around 1 g on the skid pad depending on setup, dirt cheap on the used market.

– If in Europe, a 996 or 997 Porsche 911.

A mid 2000s Porsche. (996)

They’re reliable, relatively cheap meaning you could buy 3-4 entire fully running models for less than 10k each, and use them for parts, they’re exotic and have a more timeless appearance than most cars from that time. As for speed, they can go top to 177 mph!

At what miles does a car start to wear and break down?

  • Toyota, Lexus, Daihatsu, Honda, Subaru, Suzuki,  Volvo: 300,000
  • Audi, BMW, Mercedes, Lincoln, VW, Skoda, Seat, Mazda, Mini: 250,000
  • Ford, Buick, Chrysler, Dodge, Land Rover: 200,000
  • Opel, Chevrolet, Peugeot, Citroen, Dacia, Smart: 150,000
  • Renault, Fiat, Lada: 100,000 – on a good da, though I know of many examples of people throwing in the towel with one of these only a few weeks old.

Source: Here

While the mechanics of  fancy vehicles like Mercedes, BMW, Lincoln may be designed to last longer than most, the fatal flaw is that the electronics are buggers and will make the car useless long before the cylinders give up the ghost.

Caveat:

All those makes with proper maintenance will go much longer if you

  • Change coolant every 5 years or less
  • Change oil religiously with an excellent synthetic oil at proper intervals, and use OEM filters
  • Service  automatic transmissions at 50k miles
  • Change differential and transfer case oils at 100k
  • Check hoses belts and replace if necessary at 100k miles


Algorithm and Tricks to save up to 30 cents per litre on Gas in USA and Canada

Algorithm and Tricks to save up to 30 cents per litre on Gas in USA and Canada

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Looking to save a few cents per litre on gas in the USA or Canada? Here are a few tips and tricks that can help you do just that.

First, make sure you’re using the gas rewards program at your local gas station. By using a gas rewards card, you can earn points that can be redeemed for discounts at the pump. Additionally, many gas stations offer coupons and promotions that can save you money on gas purchases. Be sure to check the gas station’s website or app for any current offers.

Second, consider carpooling or taking public transportation when possible. This will help you save on gas costs and may even improve your fuel economy. If you must drive, try to consolidate your errands into one trip instead of making multiple trips. This will also help you save on gas.

Finally, keep your car well-maintained. A well-tuned engine can improve your fuel economy by up to 4%. Additionally, properly inflated tires can also improve your fuel economy by up to 3%. By following these simple tips, you can easily save up to 30 cents per litre on gas in the USA and Canada.

Gas is getting very expensive and we are trying to help consumers save on Gas by providing you daily tricks to help you save up to 30 cents per litre on Gas in USA and Canada.

Tricks to save up to 30 cents per litre on Gas in USA and Canada

1- Go shop for Food at Safeway and get an automatic 15 cents per litre discount at Safeway Fueling stations

2- To get 30 cents discount at Safeway Fuel stations, use the code below based on Epoch:

[Day]-800-[random 5digits]

Example:  Safeway 16 to 30 cents cents off gas code

  • For July 16 2022, so the  Epoch Day is:  197
  • A random 5 digits  (Change the 5 digits if it doesn’t work. )
  • So a Coupon to save 30 cents per litre at Safeway Gas Station on July 16, 2022 is:   
  • 197-800-263944
  • (Remember to change the random 5 digits until it works)

3. Purchase Discount Gift Cards for Gas

Rewards card – Cashback

You can discover a great deal of rebate gift vouchers for gas on the web. These will work all things considered Shell, Gulf, and Mobil stations. They will spare a couple of dollars for each buy, yet that can add up to enormous reserve funds on a yearly premise.

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The Optimum program is one of the better value points programs. And the points convert to cash discounts on stuff you buy every day, rather than air travel and catalogues full of slightly aged-out consumer trinkets that you don’t really need.

PC Optimum savings on gas
PC Optimum savings on gas

If you are a Costco member and also optimum member, which option gives you the most savings?

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 From a quick google of prices in my area it looks like the average price is around $2/L and Costco is currently around $1.75. The value of the Optimum program is more that you can keep your eye out for specials and earn points which can then be put toward gas purchases. But the basic earnings of 10 pts/litre (1¢ equivalent) and redeem up to 4,000 pts ($4 equivalent) aren’t anywhere near 25¢/litre. If you don’t mind the lines 😉

If you have one near, try to fuel up at Mobil gas instead of Esso. Esso provides 15 points per liter, Mobil gas provides 35 points per liter.

I used to have a work vehicle that I filled with Mobil gas, on the company credit card, got approx. 30 dollars of free groceries from Loblaws every week because of this practice.

Which card gives 10% cash back at the moment?

TD , CIBC and Scotia all have one right now. It’s 10% cashback on purchases up to $2000 in the first three months.

I use CIBC Dividend card not only do I save on gas (.03 off a litre till you get 300l then .10 off one time and then it resets) but earn Cashback everywhere. Last yr I earned about 580 Cashback this yr I’m over 200 right now.

I bank with CIBC as I use my card I pay it off same day so never paid interest.

Note that your max yearly cash back for the 4% (gas and groceries), 2% and 1.5% categories is $800 (4% of $20,000). After $20,000 yearly spend, the 4% cash back ends, and is replaced with 0.5% on all purchases. In other words, if you spend on any of the other categories, you won’t get the $800, because you’ll hit $20,000 total spend before you hit $20,000 on gas and groceries.

I got a Rogers World Elite card, and use it for all purchases except gas and groceries, for 1.5% cash back. I use the cibc dividend card only for gas and groceries for 4% cash back.

CAA members save 3 cents per L at all shell stations. And they use air miles.

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4. Drive Sensibly

Quick quickening and short explosions of speed can cost you a ton with regards to gas. Slow and reliable movement is constantly favored over aimless driving. Land Rovers, for example, can show signs of improvement mileage utilizing journey control. Practice smooth driving and you’ll certainly set aside some cash with improved gas mileage.

5. Time Your Trips to the Gas Station

Gas costs can ascend on Thursdays because of high odds of end of the week travel. To keep away from these expanded costs, top off the tank before Thursday or on significant occasions.

6. Utilize Your Smartphone to Find the Cheapest Gas Station


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Your cell phone is for something other than perusing Facebook and Instagram. Use it to locate the least expensive gas in your general vicinity. Applications like AAA Triptik and GasBuddy will assist you with finding the closest and least expensive fuel. gas

Something I’ve noticed with the gas saving apps… many times the prices are wrong. I show up at a station, and end up refueling anyway, and then a few minutes later I see it has been put back to the “fake low price”.

I think owners are gaming the system in order to draw people in.

7. Get a Gas Rewards Card

Too few have a gas rewards card. It resembles not getting a prizes plan regardless of whether you’re a long standing customer. There are a great deal of sites out there that can acquaint you with bargains for fuel rewards. You can get free gas on the off chance that you gather enough focuses, so why not? Pursue that prizes card!

8. Try not to Leave Your Engine Idling for Very Long

Close off your motor in case you’re not going anyplace. You’re squandering gas, and you’re dirtying nature.

9. Deliberately Use Cards or Cash

money or credit

A few service stations charge a premium on the off chance that you pay with Visas, however some give you limits on them. Discover and use what you can to set aside cash.

10. Keep up Your Car

Keeping your vehicle kept up is the manner by which to get a good deal on gas over the long haul. In the event that you have a clunker or a vehicle that you treat severely, it will have awful mileage. Simply keeping your tires expanded can improve your gas mileage by 3.3%. So focus on your support.

11. Be Picky

Corner store

Quit heading off to the corner store near your home or the interstate so you can get it over with. This can cost you almost 15 pennies more for every gallon. Discover a corner store that has modest costs and stick with it.

11. Try not to Overload Your Car

over-burden vehicle

This is an easy decision, however it needs strengthening. In case you’re hauling around as long as you can remember in your vehicle, quit doing it. Clearly the heavier your vehicle gets the more gas it will require to cover a similar separation. Just keep the minimum necessities in your vehicle. Leave the rest at home.

This application gets you 40/cents per gallon money back at several gas stations. Average individuals are getting paid hundreds, and expert drivers are getting thousands with this application that gets you 40cents money back on each gallon of gas!”

12. Drive more slowly and think ahead and use motor braking.

The amount of time you win for speeding is so little compared to the amount of fuel you are going to save.

13. Plan out grocery trips for longer times. Instead of going a few times a week to pick up a couple things, go once every 2-3 weeks with a list of everything you’ll need for that timeframe.

14. Drive the smallest stick shift diesel available. Press in your clutch on downhills, especially long ones on the freeway. Play a game where you try to put as little foot on the gas.

15. Buy a more fuel efficient car. That makes the biggest difference.

16. Drive less. Combine trips. Carpool. Walk. Bicycle. Take public transit.

Do things (including many types of work) that can be done over a wire, over that wire, instead of driving to it. Drive a more fuel-efficient vehicle. If people would bother to think about when all of these might be possible, they would find that they generally are possible.

16. Limit discretionary driving. 

I have a gas-powered SUV and paid nearly $60 to fill its tank last week. I no longer drive around town just for the hell of it—I have to be strategic. Instead of driving to Target or Walmart for household goods and groceries, I order these necessities for delivery via Amazon. If I do need to drive to one part of town, I hit all the shops in that area at once and act as if I won’t be back for weeks. Ultimately, I am driving with intent—every trip has a purpose.

17. Tyres

Find the Tyre pressure placard in your car and make sure your tyres are pumped up to the correct pressure.

Try and do this when you have driven the car for less than 5 minutes. hot air expands and will give a false reading if the tyres are hot. do it when it is cold. Do NOT pump them up to the max pressure listed on the side of the tyre.

Keeping your tire pressure perfect is not only a safety measure but also helps in Saving Fuel as the right amount of tire pressure will reduce the friction with the road.

Tips- Tire pressure check is free on every petrol pump, but it does not mean it’s useless. Make Use of It every time you can.

Actually, over-inflate your tires for best gas mileage.

The number on your door is the recommended pressure. The max pressure on the tire is the “do not exceed” number. Something in between is fine.

The drawback is that you’re going to wear out the middle of the tire quicker than the sides (because it’ll dome a bit from the higher pressure if you don’t have enough weight to force it flatter again). This might be noticeable after years.

But tires aren’t that expensive, and fuel is. You’ll pay off the small reduction in tire life with the bigger reduction in fuel use (and, especially if you’re in a pinch today, you could kind of consider it a deferred expense). And, it’s a small change you can always taper off again later.

A side effect will be a slightly harsher ride, and slightly less grip (not great for the winter).

Roughly speaking, 50% of your gas usage comes from rolling resistance in the tires, the other 50% from air resistance. At city speeds, tires and starts/stops make up most of your gas cost. Around 2/3, 3/4 of highway speeds is where air resistance takes over. Above 60mph/100kmph is where you really start to gobble fuel disproportionately (10% faster uses 33% more fuel).

Avoid where you have to use the brakes. Any time you use the brakes you’re wasting all the energy you had to put into accelerating the vehicle. In stop/go traffic, this is most of your fuel use. So instead of racing forward to fill gaps and then have to stop, just drive half the speed, steadily. If you see the light is red, get off the gas and coast, don’t accelerate up to it and then hit the gas. Careful you’re not blocking turning lanes by driving slower, just because you’re stopping at the lights doesn’t mean everyone behind you is.

In short… there’s no free lunch here. If there were ways to save money on gas, those would already be things we’re doing. All the little tips and tricks might add up to 20%, which is like… where gas prices were a month ago.

The only easy way to save money on gas is to drive less.

18. Lose weight.

Get rid of any excess stuff you have in your car. Every extra kilo costs money to haul around. Same goes for aerodynamics. those roof racks you never use? take them off!

19. Change your driving style.

So many people these days drive aggressively. stamping your foot to the floor whenever you accelerate is both unnecessary and burns far more fuel than using 50 or 75% throttle. there are other throttle positions than 100%!

Instead of speeding up to close any gap in front of you. leave it there and coast a bit. someone may change lanes, who cares? watch ahead, if cars start braking ahead, take your foot off the throttle early and coast a bit instead of riding the car in front of you constantly braking and accelerating.

20. Drive smoothly. it’s amazing how big of a difference driving style makes to fuel consumption.

21. Engine Air Filter

Make sure the engine air filter is clean, dirty air filters make for poor fuel consumption.

22. Premium Fuels

Only go for premium fuels if the car company suggests you to. Otherwise, you are just increasing the cost of fuel and increasing the overall running cost of your car. Well, it’s a myth that premium fuel will help you save more fuel and increase the mileage of your car It’s False.

Tips- Buy Normal Fuel, Premium fuel burns more and adds more price and Same less Fuel.

23. Cruise Control

Using cruise control on the highway will provide a smooth ride with a little bit of constant acceleration. Ultimately it will add to your mileage and save you a lot of fuel.

24. Race Peddle Control

If you keep a soft foot on the peddle you will always Save lots of Fuel. When we use a hard foot car consumes the maximum amount of fuel that needs to generate the power we want.

Tips – After attaining a speed of 70-80 try losing your foot maintaining the race paddle at the fixed position where the acceleration is almost zero.

25. Keep RPM Low

Higher RPM means higher fuel consumption and Lower RPM helps in Saving Fuel providing a safe feeling to every passenger in the car.

Tips- Remember you can only create a very little difference in time if you drive fast keeping your speed and RPM high. But you can’t save more than 5 Min as per the traffic on the roads these days. Keep it Low to Save Fuel.

26. Save Fuel by Driving Smart

Driving consciously and safely will always help in maintaining the mileage of a car and Save Fuel. Avoiding unnecessary fast pickups and jackrabbit stops will always help in saving fuel.

Tips – Easy and Safe driving will help in Saving Fuel and driving safety.

27. Overlooked button on your car may help save on gas

The ‘Air Recirculating’ button on your A/C might cool off your car faster and save you a little gas. On most cars, trucks, and SUVs the air recirculation button is easily identifiable, with its representing symbol of a half-circle inside of the outline of a vehicle. Many people say they’re aware of the button, but are not sure when it should be on or off.

Another function of this climate control system is to stop pollution and exhaust fumes from entering the vehicle. Having this button activated will also help to greatly reduce pollen when driving, which is a big positive if you suffer from outdoor allergens.

“If you don’t switch the air recirculation button on, then your car’s air conditioning will be constantly cooling warm air from outside your vehicle, and will have to work much harder, putting more stress on the blower and air compressor,” said Ruhl.

Another benefit to using the air recirculation feature is the money you could save on gas.

“Cars are usually more fuel-efficient when the air conditioner is set to recirculate interior air. This is because keeping the same air cool takes less energy than continuously cooling hot air from outside,” said Ruhl.

While the recirculation button is great for the summer months, it may be best to avoid it in the winter or when your windows become foggy.

“Anytime you’re using defrost, it’s best to not have that button on. Also, using it while you have your heater on isn’t going to do anything for you vehicle,” said Ruhl.

Source.

28. Your driving habits are a huge factor. Very slow accelerations and decelerations help dramatically. Coasting to that upcoming red light instead of keeping on the gas and braking. Chilling at 60 on cruise in the right lane vs accelerating between 65 and 75 passing people in the left. Things like that.

Also for most cars, above 55 its better to keep your windows up and use ac, below 55 better to do windows down and ac off. Varys by model due to aerodynamics, but 55 is good enough to give you an idea.

29. Don’t hard accelerate

Try to slow down in a more gentle manner if your lucky the light will go green before you stop

Be consistent with your speed if it’s 30 mph zone try not to go faster than that or get distracted to the point where your car starts slowing down

If it’s hot out keep the windows down, AC in older cars can make the car consume more gas, not sure how these newer cars are doing with that.

Make sure your tires have good tread, bald tires can spin out more and if the wear is uneven that can cause additional issues.

30. If you drive a SUV trade it for a Toyota Corolla

Scientifically proven that the wavelength of reflections on the beige tone is in the optimal bandwidth to reduce optical resistance, thus better fuel efficiency.

Check your engine air filter. Make sure it is clean, replace if necessary. Make sure your tires are filled to the recommended pressure.

Also change spark plugs at their recommended service life.

Also, if you car is over 160k km, good idea to replace the O2 sensors as they get slow. Replaced all four sensors in my car and my mileage went from 9.x L/100 km to the high 7’s.

What kind of car should you buy that saves on gas?

A Prius, or any type of gas/electric hybrid, or a smaller vehicle, like a Toyota Corolla, Honda Civic, Chevy Malibu, Ford Focus, VW GTI or Rabbit.

But there is a direct correlation between How you drive, regardless of What you drive. I have a 1998 Chevy Silverado, with a 5.7L (350 cu in) V8, and I can get great MPG’s when I drive it sensibly, and don’t have a ton of unnecessary stuff/gear in the back, or even back seat.

Make sure the tires are set to the appropriate PSI. Always set them to the pressure setting on the inside of the drivers door. On that subject, changing the tire size or wheel size and sidewall thickness will also have a negative effect on MPG.

You would be surprised how much stuff a lot of people have laying in the back of their car, and if they would simply clean it out, they could save money.

Also, keeping your vehicle tuned up and the oil changed per the owners manual will also help keep the MPG high.

Not speeding away from every stop sign or stop light will also help.

 

Keeping your speed down on the freeway will help.

However, opting to roll the windows down instead of using the A/C to keep cool will actually create drag on the car and lower the efficiency. So crank the heat sucker up to high. Not only with rolling the windows up save fuel, it will also reduce noise and reduce fatigue, so you can drive more comfortably.

What burns more gas, accelerating as fast as possible to 60 mph (e.g. 10 seconds) or accelerating slowly (e.g. 30 seconds)?

Not long ago I had a ’16 Subaru WRX. Fast, turbo-charged all-wheel-drive car. Terrible gas mileage. It’s also heavy, roughly two tons.

One day, I did an experiment on the city streets. Rather than accelerate in a controlled manner and drive at a consistent pace, I put the gas pedal all the way down to reach about 15 mph over the speed limit, and then I put the car in neutral, and let it coast. The car would coast a full mile before it was going slow enough (5 to 10 mph below the speed limit) that I had to put it in gear and goose the throttle again full blast and bring it up to 15 mph over the speed limit.

In this simple test, the overall gas mileage skyrocketed. It went from about 25 mpg to more like 40 mpg. And yet I was ultimately going the speed limit on average, and kicking off my trips very quickly.

This led me to a realization. Yes, holding that gas pedal all the way down uses up a lot of gas. But what it also does is important: it brings you up to speed. What also uses up a lot of gas is simply cruising—not coasting, cruising. That’s where most of your gas is being spent, because your engine is expending gas, quite a bit of it, actually, just to keep up and maintain velocity.

And when you accelerate slowly, you’re effectively cruising, without being up to speed, yet with a little extra gas. That’s wasteful, because you’re going slow and still using up plenty of gas. Is it more wasteful than the explosion of rushing your car forward immediately? Actually, perhaps so, if you’re taking too long to do it.

Remember, just turning that engine using fuel uses up fuel. Accelerating quickly brings the car up to speed quickly—which brings the engine’s productivity to the maximum output quickly—which is not an infinite dump of fuel, it is limited to what the fuel line and injector and cylinder can mix with air and compress, which is measurable, and it’s actually not as far off from cruising fuel as people seem to think. Source: Quora

 TIPS ON PUMPING GAS THAT WILL SAVE YOU $$$

1️⃣ Only buy or fill up your car or truck in the early morning when the ground temperature is still cold. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground the more dense the gasoline, when it gets warmer gasoline expands, so buying in the afternoon or in the evening….your gallon is not exactly a gallon. In the petroleum business, the specific gravity and the temperature of the gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, ethanol and other petroleum products plays an important role.

2️⃣ A 1-degree rise in temperature is a big deal for this business. But the service stations do not have temperature compensation at the pumps.

3️⃣ When you’re filling up do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to a fast mode If you look you will see that the trigger has three (3) stages: low, middle, and high. You should be pumping on low mode, thereby minimizing the vapors that are created while you are pumping. All hoses at the pump have a vapor return. If you are pumping on the fast rate, some of the liquid that goes to your tank becomes vapor. Those vapors are being sucked up and back into the underground storage tank so you’re getting less worth for your money.

4️⃣ One of the most important tips is to fill up when your gas tank is HALF FULL. The reason for this is the more gas you have in your tank the less air occupying its empty space. Gasoline evaporates faster than you can imagine. Gasoline storage tanks have an internal floating roof. This roof serves as zero clearance between the gas and the atmosphere, so it minimizes the evaporation. Unlike service stations, here where I work, every truck that we load is temperature compensated so that every gallon is actually the exact amount.

5️⃣ Another reminder, if there is a gasoline truck pumping into the storage tanks when you stop to buy gas, DO NOT fill up; most likely the gasoline is being stirred up as the gas is being delivered, and you might pick up some of the dirt that normally settles on the bottom.

6️⃣ Note: If the pump repeatedly shuts off early, it could be a sign of a problem with the vapor recovery system, such as a clogged carbon canister.”

How can You save gas when driving long distances?

1. First and foremost Maintain a steady speed.
2. Fill your tire pressure 1 or 2 psi more than the prescribed number.
3. Do not travel with your AC off, especially during long distance journey. With your AC off you will have to lower the car windows and if you are traveling at speed more than 60 miles per hour it is going to affect the aerodynamics of the car and this might affect the fuel consumption a bit.
4. Remove all unnecessary weight from the car.
5. Choose a well maintained road even if it is going to take you more time than a bad road.
6. Have your car checked with a mechanic before you travel.

Do automobiles get better fuel mileage with the A.C. on and windows up, or A.C. off, and windows down?

Under 70mph and your windows up, your AC will use more energy than if the windows were down and the AC off. As your cruising speed increases, the aerodynamic drag on the car increases to the point where having the windows down creates a greater load on the engine than the AC does. This only applies to modern cars which are generally quite aerodynamic. Having the windows up or down doesn’t really make any difference to vintage cars. Remember though, AC takes more power than you might suppose so on a long hot journey, driving with the AC off will improve mpg. Taking the AC equipment off altogether will make an even bigger difference – as much as 10%.

 
 

Does cruising in a car save on gas? How?

 

Since cruising involves maintaining the vehicle at a constant velocity, it requires minimum efforts (Power) from the engine.
The power required from the engine is used to nullify the declaration from frictional forces (air drag and road adhesion). Since less power is required from engine the ECU ensures minimum gas is used.

Can lowering your tailgate really save on gas?

No it’s a myth…in fact the now cancelled show MythBuster’s did an episode on it. Pretty legit test if I do say so, although if you have a truck with two gas tanks you could test it yourself as I have. The one thing that can help seems counterintuitive, which is add a little weight. Like around 100 pounds or so depending, and make sure it’s over or behind the rear axle in the bed. What this does is give the rear wheels a bit more traction and that increases your gass mileage a little. A trick I learned from my Grandpa as a curious little kid wondering why he always had a couple spares mounted to each side of the bed right up against the tailgate. Those old gas guzzlers need all the efficiency they could get.

Bonus: also works better in snow, ice, and slush…get some sand bags and throw them in the same spot behind the axle and you limit fishtailing/sliding in the winter. More weight than the hundred pounds, plus it has multiple uses. If you get stuck where the tires are spinning on the ice you can open up a sand bag and out the sand in front and behind the tire to help gain traction. Make sure to do both sides of the truck as you probably won’t have positraction. Lol…additionally if it’s not too cold you can pee on the ice around the tire. I have gotten many a people unstuck with a little sand and piss.

 

How can I save gas when driving long distances?

 

1. First and foremost Maintain a steady speed.
2. Fill your tire pressure 1 or 2 psi more than the prescribed number.
3. Do not travel with your AC off, especially during long distance journey. With your AC off you will have to lower the car windows and if you are traveling at speed more than 60 miles per hour it is going to affect the aerodynamics of the car and this might affect the fuel consumption a bit.
4. Remove all unnecessary weight from the car.
5. Choose a well maintained road even if it is going to take you more time than a bad road.
6. Have your car checked with a mechanic before you travel.

Hope these points might help you.

Can I keep driving on eco mode? How much does it save on gas?

Economy mode is useful on most conditions but be advised, that some engines need to be “ blown free” by using higher rpm snd full engine load in order to keep the exhaust/ turbo- system declogged. That applies especially to diesel- engines with egr- system. In “ grandfather”— drive mode only those will have need for extended overhaul way before resching estimated end of service- time. ( what absolutely nullifies all eventual gains from eco- mode

 

What are some ways to save on gas annually?

To save gas you should follow the instructions of the manufacturer of your car if your question refers to the gasoline that you spend to make your car run. If your question refers to the natural gas that you use at home to heat up food, water etc then the only recommendation is to watch for any leaks if you suspect that you are losing gas. Fixing those leaks by means of an experienced technician will resolve your problem. Coming back to your car, not over speeding, and not letting the engine on idle for long time in order to keep the air conditioner working or the heater in the Winter these are two important ways to reduce gasoline consumption.

Summary:

Looking to save a few cents per litre on gas? Here are a few tips and tricks that can help you do just that:

1. Check gas prices before you fill up. Many gas stations offer discounts for cash, so it’s worth checking beforehand to see if there’s a station nearby that offers a cheaper price.

2. Use coupons. Many gas stations offer coupons that can be used to save money at the pump. Simply present the coupon when you’re paying and you’ll automatically get a discount.

3. Shop around for gas cards. Some gas cards offer discounts of up to 5 cents per litre, so it’s worth doing some research to see if you could be saving even more money.

4. Drive less. This one is obvious, but the less you drive, the less gas you’ll need to purchase. So, if you can carpool, take public transportation, or walk/bike instead of driving, you’ll save yourself some money in the long run.

5. Keep your car well-maintained. A well-tuned engine can improve your fuel economy by up to 4%, so it’s worth getting your car checked out by a mechanic every

By following these tips, you can easily save money on gas without making major changes to your lifestyle.

Does getting a Tesla make financial sense in terms of cost savings on gas and maintenance?

If you looked at all the cars in the world and calculated which one had the lowest cost per mile transporting someone from Point A to Point B. It would probably not be a Tesla. If people used that criterion for buying a car, then there would be only one car in each class. People buy cars for lots of reasons. If you’re keeping the car for 5 years, some high-mileage hybrids will cost less (absent government subsidies) than a Tesla. Gas is cheap these days. Push it out 10 years or if gas prices go back up, the calculus is different. Your Tesla will outperform that high-mileage hybrid and be a lot more fun to drive. How much is that worth to you?
 
 
 

With rising prices, what are smart ways to save money or good alternatives like horse and carriage to save on gas?

This is my plan for tackling the current inflationary environment in the United States:

  • Limit discretionary driving. I have a gas-powered SUV and paid nearly $60 to fill its tank last week. I no longer drive around town just for the hell of it—I have to be strategic. Instead of driving to Target or Walmart for household goods and groceries, I order these necessities for delivery via Amazon. If I do need to drive to one part of town, I hit all the shops in that area at once and act as if I won’t be back for weeks. Ultimately, I am driving with intent—every trip has a purpose.
  • Meal substitution. In my area of the U.S., beef is less expensive than chicken. Thus, I substitute beef for chicken and prepare meals like spaghetti, burgers, and chili. Also, my cost of groceries has risen faster than the cost of a Chipotle burrito, for instance, so I sometimes eat a Chipotle burrito instead of eating at home.
  • Plan for higher utilities. My energy bill is much higher today than it was last year. Since I live in an apartment, each unit’s bill is decided by dividing the energy cost for the entire building by the number of occupied units. Thus, I have very little control over the cost of my monthly bill. I must prepare for this expense and not let it blindside me.
  • Limit unnecessary consumption. Now is not the time to be frivolous with money. All nonessential consumption (i.e., online shoe shopping, going to the movies, etc.) is essentially placed on hold.
  • Invest tactfully. With inflation running hot, the Federal Reserve likely hiking interest rates in the coming months, and macroeconomic and political uncertainty, the stock and crypto markets may fall further before rising once again. Having dry powder (i.e., cash) on hand to take advantage of the situation is not a bad idea. I’ve been building my cash position over the past couple of months, so I can buy assets when others are fearful and need/decide to sell. As a long-term investor, you want to buy into fear and weakness, and I believe we are in that environment.
 

How much money do you save on gas with a hybrid?

If you compare a small, light ICE vehicle, you won’t save anything but if you compare an ICE car of the same weight as an EV then you will save money, possibly as much as $10 every 200 miles.

 
 
 

How much money do you save on gas by paying cash instead of credit in the long-term?

 

Using a 10 cent per gal difference between cash & cc, that comes to about $28 extra per year to use my credit card for my mileage and average MPG. That’s about $2.33/month so not much at all. Then you need to take into account that I get 3% back using my credit card at the pump from my credit card rewards program. That comes to $29/year. Those were round number calculations I did though so we’ll just call it even.

 

Does cruise control actually save gas or is that a myth?

The cruise control itself does not save any gas compared to simply keeping your foot at the same position. However, what cruise control does tend to do, is influence the driving style of the human inside.

The whole point of the cruise control is that you don’t need to constantly control the throttle. And thus you will tend to want to avoid needing to do that while using it. At the most, you will want to disengage the cruise control, to reduce speed slowly when needed, and then re-engage when you can overtake.

The result is that you tend to start looking further ahead, a few cars further than the one directly in front of you. Coming up on a car, you will decide earlier if you can overtake, or if you lift the throttle. This is very positive for reducing fuel consumption.

Many drivers without cruise control will not lift until the last moment, and then often need to brake when they can’t overtake. This is disastrous for the fuel consumption.

There are some special situations where cruise control itself can help reducing fuel consumption. One of those is when using the highest gear at very low throttle. This tends to be the most fuel-efficient configuration, but with so little torque, it can be difficult to keep the speed constant. The cruise control can do that very well. If you can’t manage to drive comfortably at that speed yourself, but the cruise control can, then that is a case where the cruise control directly allows higher fuel efficiency.

Another is when your car doesn’t have a mid-console near your foot, and thus is it difficult to lean your foot against it, helping keep a steady position. In that case, driving without cruise control might lead to constant speed changes as well, and the cruise control could help smooth that. That will also improve fuel efficiency slightly.

But in general, anything the cruise control does, you can do as well… It’s is the driving style that improves fuel efficiency. Cruise control can stimulate a more relax driving style, and that helps. If you already were driving relaxed and smooth, then you’ll not notice any difference.

 

By improving public roads in order to minimize rolling resistance and enhance traction, how much money could be saved on gas consumption and avoidance of traffic accidents?

Patent 6,923,124 has a rolling surface that is 1000 times smoother than typical asphalt. This smooth rolling surface and engineered reverse sag allows steel wheels instead of energy wasting rubber tires. All oil can be avoided (saved) by switching to aerodynamic vehicles rolling on three more perfect rolling surfaces configured in a triangle. There is no reason a car should ever leave the normally traveled portion of the roadway. Designing in 3D means a vehicle can never come off the designated trajectory. Instead of a reactive suspension producing pitch, yaw and roll the guideway produces those motions with precision. This improved “road” (guideway) allows for 180 mph travel at a tiny fraction of the required energy. This in turn allows all transportation to be powered by a 7 foot wide s
 

If I drove 100 miles every day, how long would it take me to pay off my electric car with the money I save on gas?

 
Ok, let’s get serious, and go about doing this the way a person would who’s really trying to save money. Two scenarios: * Aggressive scenario: Buy a used 2014 Nissan Leaf for $8,000. It will only have about 30,000 miles and a range around 85 miles. In my area, electricity will cost 2 cents per mile since our electricity is fairly cheap. Assume the gas car being replaced was getting 30 mpg, so its fuel cost is 11 cents per mile. You are commuting to work each day, 50 miles each way. You don’t have enough range to get home, but your employer offers free charging. (That can happen. My employer does.) Driving 100 miles per day, paying for half and getting half from your employer, will cost $1.00 per day, or $30 per month. The gas car would cost $11 per day or $330 per month. Savings is $300 per
 

What kind of car should I buy that saves on gas?

Short answer:  Toyota corolla or Honda civic

But there is a direct correlation between How you drive, regardless of What you drive. I have a 1998 Chevy Silverado, with a 5.7L (350 cu in) V8, and I can get great MPG’s when I drive it sensibly, and don’t have a ton of unnecessary stuff/gear in the back, or even back seat.

Make sure the tires are set to the appropriate PSI. Always set them to the pressure setting on the inside of the drivers door. On that subject, changing the tire size or wheel size and sidewall thickness will also have a negative effect on MPG.

You would be surprised how much stuff a lot of people have laying in the back of their car, and if they would simply clean it out, they could save money.

Also, keeping your vehicle tuned up and the oil changed per the owners manual will also help keep the MPG high.

Not speeding away from every stop sign or stop light will also help.

Keeping your speed down on the freeway will help.

However, opting to roll the windows down instead of using the A/C to keep cool will actually create drag on the car and lower the efficiency. So crank the heat sucker up to high. Not only with rolling the windows up save fuel, it will also reduce noise and reduce fatigue, so you can drive more comfortably.

 
 

When I have little gas left in my car, is it better to drive fast or slow so that I can get the best distance out of the amount of gas left?

 

Look at all the other mileage techniques that other people have formulated over the years, they all apply. Basically:

  1. Accelerate firmly from a stop. Too slowly, and you waste time in low gears, which are inefficient. Too fast, your engine is burning more fuel than it needs to. 8 – 10 seconds to 40mph is good, get a feel for your car, maybe get a OBD sensor to monitor fuel usage directly (any car after 1990s has one, I think)
  2. Try to get to the top gear, and at lowest RPM. Engine spins the slowest for maximum distance. A little slower is usually ok, especially if the car has bad drag coefficients, or there’s a lot of stops. Accelerating to top gear only to brake for a stop light is a waste of fuel.
  3. Modern cars cut fuel when engine braking. Try to roll as far/long as possible without using the brakes and avoid idling. Braking early, then rolling is better than coming to a complete stop since idling is just a constant drain, and if the light goes green, you save kinetic energy. You can usually feel when the ECU starts fuel delivery again when the engine braking lessens, though forcing downshifts is not recommended due to
    1. Increased wear on a transmission which is more expensive than brake replacement
    2. the spurt of fuel needed to kick the RPMs up. Though it may be needed if you need every last drop. Try downshifting early, if needed.

Try not to use neutral when coasting since the engine is still running. Also, its generally illegal

4. coast up hill, accelerate downhill (where possible). Don’t roll down the hill backwards.

5. If in a Hybrid, try to coast at 0 throttle and 0 regen. Regen, while nice, is fundamentally inefficient due to multiple transformations of energy. At 0 throttle, the engine is off, and no fuel is used. Hybrids generally have low drag, so can go pretty far on flat ground.

6. Tailgating can save some fuel, but it isn’t really safe. A few car lengths of distance can still yield a bit, though don’t overspeed to do so.

7. Turn engine off if you’re gonna be stopped for long periods of time.

 

Is driving slow up on a hill(consume less fuel but takes longer) or fast(consume more fuel but takes less time) better choice for fuel saving ? The hill would be 1 km for reference.

The answer is matching the proper rev range to power to be most efficient.

The real world answer is that if it’s just a kilometer the difference is negligible

Engines are most efficient usually somewhere at the 1/3 to half of the RPM range and at decent load. So if you need to floor it to get on the hill on current gear, downshift, else just press pedal slightly stronger and keep the speed.

As long as you can engine brake downhill the speed doesn’t really matter, just keep the usual traffic speed.

In general accelerating just to slow down later is worse than just keeping steady pace, especially if there are brakes involved.

That’s a good question, but not a simple one to answer.

A car is most efficient when in its highest gear. If you accelerate too slowly, you will spend too much time in the lower gears before you get into the highest gear. Therefore, accelerating excessively slowly is not the most economical technique. Thus, advise to accelerate slowly to save fuel is WRONG!

A few decades ago, BMW did some tests to determine the most economical way to drive their cars. Although that was before fuel injection became common, I’m sure that the rules have not changed very much. They found that for their cars, the most economical technique was to accelerate with a heavy foot (2/3 to 3/4 throttle) but upshift at only 2000 rpm. That works well for a manual transmission, but is generally impossible with an automatic transmission because it will upshift at a considerably higher speed if you use a heavy foot and, just as bad, delay locking the torque converter. So, with an automatic transmission, the most economical technique is probably to accelerate at a moderate rate, i.e., not too fast and not too slowly.

The rules may have changed slightly because of modern electronic fuel injection systems which control the fuel mixture better. They are less likely to deliver an excessively rich mixture at wide throttle openings which occur with a very heavy foot.

With an Otto-cycle engine (4-stroke, spark ignition), the throttle valve is an important source of inefficiency. The power required to suck in air against the vacuum created by the throttle valve wastes fuel. For that reason, an Otto-cycle engine is most efficient when the throttle valve is wide open, or nearly so, provided that the fuel system does not provide an excessively riche mixture under those conditions. That’s why it is most efficient to use a heavy foot and upshift at low speeds, but not at such low speeds that the engine knocks or doesn’t run smoothly since that could cause damage.

The most inefficient thing you can do is use a lower gear than necessary for the power you are using. So, if you delay upshifting until 3000 rpm when, with a heavier foot you could get the same power at 2000 rpm, you are wasting fuel. So, for fuel efficiency, you should upshift at the lowest possible speed that will provide the power you need, but not at such a low speed that the that the engine protests.

In simplistic physics terms, it makes no difference. You create the same amount of kinetic energy either way – and theoretically, that means you must burn the same amount of fuel.

For an internal combustion engine with gears it gets complicated.

A conventional car engine has a range of RPM’s at which the engine operates most efficiently. At lower or higher RPM’s gas consumption is worse.

So the trick is to keep the car in that band.

With a manual gearbox – the best approach is to push hard on the pedal to get the RPM’s into the efficient range – then accelerate more smoothly to the top of that range – then downshift.

If your car has enough gears, you can arrange to stay in the efficient range for all but the initial acceleration in 1st gear.

However, with an automatic (and especially automatics with not many gears in their gearbox) – you have no direct control over that – so it becomes a matter of tricking the gearbox into doing what you want. With modern gearboxes, you’d hope that the manufacturer set the shift points for efficiency – but it depends on the car. For a sports car they probably optimized the shift pattern for best 0–60 time – so they’d keep the engine in the “power zone” of RPM’s rather than in the “efficiency zone”…for a family sedan, the reverse would be the case. Many cars have a “sport” button which essentially lets you choose between keeping the engine in the power band or the efficiency band.

But even on the “economy” setting, the software won’t be able to prevent you from demanding performance that drives it out of the economy range.

It also varies depending on the air temperature – when the air is cold, it’s more dense and the fuel management software can burn fuel in larger quantities than on hot days – and that may influence the decision.

There are other considerations too. If you accelerate and brake gently then it takes longer to get you where you’re going. This means that the air conditioner, radio, lights, computer(s), etc are running for longer…and that takes energy too.

On the other hand – if you continually red-line the engine, it’ll wear out faster and a worn out engine uses more gas than a good engine.

Honestly – the answer is horribly complicated – and it varies from car to car.

To Conclude:

Looking to save a few cents per litre on gas? Here are a few tips and tricks that can help you do just that:

1. Check gas prices before you fill up. Many gas stations offer discounts for cash, so it’s worth checking beforehand to see if there’s a station nearby that offers a cheaper price.

2. Use coupons. Many gas stations offer coupons that can be used to save money at the pump. Simply present the coupon when you’re paying and you’ll automatically get a discount.

3. Shop around for gas cards. Some gas cards offer discounts of up to 5 cents per litre, so it’s worth doing some research to see if you could be saving even more money.

4. Drive less. This one is obvious, but the less you drive, the less gas you’ll need to purchase. So, if you can carpool, take public transportation, or walk/bike instead of driving, you’ll save yourself some money in the long run.

5. Keep your car well-maintained. A well-tuned engine can improve your fuel economy by up to 4%, so it’s worth getting your car checked out by a mechanic every

Sources:

1- Quora

2- Reddit

3- https://vehiclecare.in/blaze/how-to-save-fuel-13-fuel-saving-tips/


Electric Cars – Autonomous Cars – Self driving cars : Tesla, CyberTruck, EV, Volt, Wayne, Nissan Leaf, Electric Bikes, e-bikes, i-cars, smart cars

CyberTruck

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This blog explores Clever Questions and Answers about Electric Vehicles, Autonomous Cars, Self driving cars, Tesla, Volt, Wayne, Nissan Leaf, Electric Bikes, e-bikes, i-cars, smart cars, Cyber Trucks, etc…

BNEF outlines that electric vehicles (EVs) will hit 10% of global passenger vehicle sales in 2025, with that number rising to 28% in 2030 and 58% in 2040. According to the study, EVs currently make up 3% of global car sales.

The 5 Levels of Autonomous Vehicles

  • Level 0 – No Automation. This describes your everyday car.
  • Level 1 – Driver Assistance. Here we can find your adaptive cruise control and lane keep assist to help with driving fatigue.
  • Level 2 – Partial Automation.
  • Level 3 – Conditional Automation.
  • Level 4 – High Automation.
  • Level 5 – Full Automation.

ASTON MARTIN RAPIDE E

Secret agent James Bond’s favorite British automaker will take the wraps off it’s its first battery-powered ride by year’s end, and it’s a true exotic sports car. Based on the low-slung Rapide coupe, production will be limited to 155 units worldwide, with a sky-high sticker price. It’s expected to run for around 200 miles on a charge and register a 0-60 mph time of less than four seconds.

BOLLINGER B1

Fledgling EV maker Bollinger Motors is ramping up to launch its first model, the B1 for 2020. It’s a decidedly boxy SUV and it looks a lot like a classic Land Rover. It’s built on an aluminum frame and comes with a dual-motor electric all-wheel-drive system. The B1 promises a 200-mile range with 613 horsepower and a strong 668 pound-feet of torque, and is said to tow as much as 7,500 pounds.

CYBER TRUCK at Tesla Car Store

Cybertruck is built with an exterior shell made for ultimate durability and passenger protection. Starting with a nearly impenetrable exoskeleton, every component is designed for superior strength and endurance, from Ultra-Hard 30X Cold-Rolled stainless-steel structural skin to Tesla armor glass.

Now entering a new class of strength, speed and versatility—only possible with an all-electric design. The powerful drivetrain and low center of gravity provides extraordinary traction control and torque—enabling acceleration from 0-60 mph in as little as 2.9 seconds and up to 500 miles of range.

Tesla Store – Discounts

Comparison between:

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  • 2021 Tesla CyberTruck Single Motor RWD
  • 2021 Tesla CyberTruck Dual Motor AWD
  • 2021 Tesla CyberTruck Tri Motor AWD

SPECS*

Tesla CyberTruck Single Motor RWD

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  • 0-60 MPH <6.5 SECONDS
  • RANGE: 250+ MILES (EPA EST.)
  • DRIVETRAIN: REAR-WHEEL DRIVE
  • Price: $USD 39900

Tesla CyberTruck Dual Motor AWD

  • 0-60 MPH <4.5 SECONDS
  • RANGE: 300+ MILES (EPA EST.)
  • DRIVETRAIN: DUAL MOTOR ALL-WHEEL DRIVE
  • Price: $USD 49900

Tesla CyberTruck Tri Motor AWD

  • 0-60 MPH <2.9 SECONDS
  • RANGE: 500+ MILES (EPA EST.)
  • DRIVETRAIN TRI MOTOR ALL-WHEEL DRIVE
  • Price: $USD 59900

Pros and Cons of CyberTruck

PROS:

Cybertruck is a vehicle that has better utility than an F-150, while beating out a Porsche 911 in performance.

Cybertruck is designed with 30X Stainless Steel, which is also used on Starship. Cybertruck uses this material for maximum durability, function, and design.

Cybertruck is a beautiful platform for a wildly futuristic design, which contains insane performance, on-road or off-road, regardless.

Cybertruck contains a beautiful full-width unibrow LED bar for a headlight, evident of form, and function packed into one package. With this headlight, maximum visibility is always present, whether at night, or at day with it’s beautiful Always-On LEDs.

With it’s ability to sprint from 0-60 in under 2.9s and be virtually bulletproof, Cybertruck is the best platform for an advanced, beautiful, technological reliant future.

CONS: Cybertruck hurdles. What are the design and production issues that engineers still have to over come?

  1. Crash tests/crumple zone.
  2. Side Mirrors?
  3. Regulatory approval
  4. Stainless steel in salty environments.
  5. Tire size/ range efficiency? Looks cool but….

I realize the shape is actually very efficient to build, ridged and aerodynamic. Looking for feedback.

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As a Tesla owner, do you agree that it’s the best car you’ve ever purchased?

Absolutely! But I’m looking forward to an even better one — Cybertruck. I fell in love with that beast the moment I saw it, and put down a reservation as quickly as possible. I find myself near the head of a long, long waiting list for this revolutionary vehicle. I hope to take delivery of a tri-motor within the first 5000 off the assembly line.

Even before seeing it up close and in person, I know it will be the best vehicle I’ll ever purchase. It goes beyond what I love about my Model 3 AWD. I don’t think of it as a pickup truck. I would never buy a traditional pickup for as little as I would use it as such. Cybertruck is an all-in-one vehicle. It’s a pickup truck, sure, but it’s also an SUV that seats six and has 100 cu ft of secure, weather protected storage. I plan to use it for wilderness camping in hard to get to places by virtue of its exemplary off-roading capabilities.

I will happily take my Cybertruck on cross country road trips. The self-driving capabilities of Tesla vehicles make long distance cruising an enjoyable experience, devoid of the typical driving fatigue that I’ve always endured traveling in other cars I’ve owned, even my Class B motor-home, which I recently sold. I’m looking forward to spending time in the back country of Alaska with the grizzlies and the moose (safely tucked inside CT, of course).

Cybertruck will be the most durable vehicle I’ve ever owned, as well. That 3mm cold rolled stainless steel exoskeleton is dent proof, bullet proof, and rust proof. The windows are almost impossible to break, and the rolling tonneau cover is strong enough to support the weight of a 200+ lb man.


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Cybertruck comes without paint of any kind which is great for squeezing through brush on abandoned logging roads. No need to hold back to avoid scratching the finish. I may have the truck painted, though, just to give it a personalized touch.

My Cybertruck won’t be left unused. It will be my daily driver. Sure, it’s large, but it won’t be like driving one of those behemoths from Detroit. It’s fast and responsive. The air suspension can be lowered to make it easier to get in and out of, improve handling, and reduce aerodynamic drag.

Add to that its 3500 lbs load capacity, its 14,000 lb towing capacity, 500+ mile range, and fast charging at the ever-expanding Tesla Supercharger network, and it’s easy to understand how this vehicle will be the best, and probably the last, vehicle I’ll ever own. Unless I deploy it to the Tesla Network as a robotaxi in a couple of years. Now there’s a money making idea!

KIA SOUL EV

Kia is redesigning its funky/boxy compact full-electric hatchback for 2020 with fresh styling and myriad improvements. A new 64 kWh liquid-cooled lithium ion polymer battery pack should deliver well in excess of 200 miles on a charge. Power will be bumped up to 200 horsepower with 291 pound-feet of torque. It will come with four drive modes and four levels of regenerative braking, including a setting for one-pedal driving.

MERCEDES-BENZ EQC

The EQC is the first in what will be a series of luxury EVs coming from Mercedes-Benz. It’s a boldly styled SUV with two electric motors that combine for an output of 402 horsepower with 564 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel-drive will be standard, along with a long list of convenience, connectivity, and safety features. In Europe it’s rated to run for 279 miles on a full charge, though that number may be somewhat lower when evaluated by U.S. standards.

MINI ELECTRIC

BMW’s Mini brand is developing a new full-electric version of the comely Cooper coupe, likely for later in 2020. Details, however, remain sketchy. Only scant visual tidbits like this one remain available. Reports say it will share technology with the BMW i3, and could run for as many as 200 miles on a full charge. Expect it to deliver Mini’s famed go-kart-like handling.

POLESTAR 2

Volvo is launching a new high-tech sub-brand this year called Polestar. While its first model, the Polestar 1, will be a plug-in hybrid, the Polestar 2 is a sleekly cast full-electric luxury four-door hatchback. Intended to compete with the Tesla Model 3, the automaker is targeting a range of 275 miles on a charge, with its two electric motors expected to put around a combined 485 pound-feet of torque to the pavement. All-wheel drive will come standard.

PORSCHE TAYCAN

Porsche’s first full-electric model will be an ultra-exotic battery-powered four-door sports car. It’s said to leap off the line and reach 62 mph (100 km/h) in a sudden 3.5 seconds. The automaker claims around 300 miles of range with a full battery, with the ability to recharge about 60 miles worth of energy in just four minutes.

RIVIAN R1T

Yet another startup EV builder, Rivian plans to introduce a futuristic-looking pickup truck for 2020 to be built in the former Mitsubishi factory in Normal, IL. No mere poseur, the R1T is said to deliver a 400-mile range, with its quad-motor system enabling off-road adventures and a 0-60 mph time of just three seconds on paved roads.

TESLA MODEL Y

Expected sometime during 2020, assuming the automaker incurs no production delays or other corporate calamities, the Tesla Model Y will essentially be a crossover SUV version of the Model 3 sedan. Smaller and less expensive than the Model X, it’s sure to become the company’s best selling model. It will initially come in performance, long-range, and dual motor all-wheel drive variants with specs similar to the Model 3.

TESLA ROADSTER

Tesla’s original Roadster was its first model and it broke new ground in terms of performance and operating range. It’s coming back for 2020 with a freshly curvy profile and uncanny performance. Tesla claims it will fly to 60 mph in a rocket-like 1.9 seconds, reach a felonious top speed of 250 mph, and run for a seemingly impossible 620 miles with a full charge.

EV Q&A

1- Does using cruise control when going downhill in an electric car use more energy?

No – quite the opposite in fact.

When going at a constant speed downhill – the car uses regenerative braking to maintain that speed without going faster and faster.

In effect, the electric motor(s) in the car are turned in to generators – and charge up the battery as they go.

Here is an actual screen shot from my Tesla Model 3 – taken shortly after driving over the Franklin Mountains in El Paso…it’s a graph of the energy consumed per mile driven over the last 30 minutes (kinda like the “mpg” number for a gasoline car):

2- How was your Tesla car buying experience? Which Tesla; Model X, Model S, Model 3, or Model Y?

I bought a Model 3 Standard Range Plus with Full-Self-Driving – a little over a year ago.

I went online – did all of the options selection, all of the financing, taxing and insuring in about 40 minutes – and without ever speaking to an actual human. The deposit money was taken from my credit card.

The car was on a 14day delivery back then – but it took a little longer – more like three3 weeks.

During which time, I had to put up with just a model-Model-3:

The full-sized model 3 was delivered on a large covered car transporter – theoretically to my front door – but in fact the driver phoned me to say he couldn’t get through the twisty streets in my neighborhood in his gigantic truck – so we met him in a nearby street. He offloaded the car – gave me time to inspect it – handed me the “credit card” car keys – and that was that. So I drove it the last 100 yards home.

This is by FAR the most pleasant way to buy a car.

SNAFU’S AND MINOR GLITCHES:

There were some SNAFU’s and complications…mostly because I live in Texas where it’s illegal for a car company to sell direct to a customer…this is true in about 50% of US states.

So what happened was that the car was sold to me in Arizona – where it’s legal. The car was delivered by Tesla to their distribution center in Phoenix Arizona – where I actually purchased it. Then Tesla did the work to re-title the car in Texas at their expense.

The car was not shipped in a Tesla transporter but by some 3rd party (whom Tesla also paid).

This complicated little legal dance would not have been noticeable to me EXCEPT that there was some confusion about my insurance. They couldn’t re-title the car to me without it being insured – and I couldn’t insure it without a VIN – and somewhere along the line someone dropped the ball.

So the car arrived with no temporary licence plates and I had to go back to Tesla and have them do that after the insurance SNAFU got ironed out. I’m still not sure whether it was their fault, my fault, my insurance company’s fault – or the DMV here in El Paso’s fault…I’m betting the latter because we’re pretty sure ours was the first Tesla ever sold here.

3- What are some unforeseen impacts of self-driving cars?

Sabotage.

Although companies like Uber and Tesla are not very successful in that aspect, fully self driving cars will have to be able to avoid collisons by all means. They simply will have to be designed in a way that they do not crash against something.

Okay, so what will a self driving car do, when another driver deliberately cuts its lane? What, if some guys make a fun out of throwing garbage cans at self driving cars? What, if some unemployed taxicab drivers try to make a ride in a self-driving taxicab as unpleasant as possible?

This is unlikely? Tell me why people spend extra money in order to make their trucks pollute the air as much as possible:

 
 

CyberTruck will cost half the competition, and here’s why the math says it works



CyberTruck will cost half the competition, and here’s why the math says it works

Sources:

Tesla

MyEV.com

Quora

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