Electric Cars – Autonomous Cars – Self driving cars : Tesla, CyberTruck, EV, Volt, Wayne, Nissan Leaf, Electric Bikes, e-bikes, i-cars, smart cars

CyberTruck

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This blog explores Clever Questions and Answers about Electric Vehicles, Autonomous Cars, Self driving cars, Tesla, Volt, Wayne, Nissan Leaf, Electric Bikes, e-bikes, i-cars, smart cars, Cyber Trucks, etc…

BNEF outlines that electric vehicles (EVs) will hit 10% of global passenger vehicle sales in 2025, with that number rising to 28% in 2030 and 58% in 2040. According to the study, EVs currently make up 3% of global car sales.

The 5 Levels of Autonomous Vehicles

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  • Level 0 – No Automation. This describes your everyday car.
  • Level 1 – Driver Assistance. Here we can find your adaptive cruise control and lane keep assist to help with driving fatigue.
  • Level 2 – Partial Automation.
  • Level 3 – Conditional Automation.
  • Level 4 – High Automation.
  • Level 5 – Full Automation.

ASTON MARTIN RAPIDE E

Secret agent James Bond’s favorite British automaker will take the wraps off it’s its first battery-powered ride by year’s end, and it’s a true exotic sports car. Based on the low-slung Rapide coupe, production will be limited to 155 units worldwide, with a sky-high sticker price. It’s expected to run for around 200 miles on a charge and register a 0-60 mph time of less than four seconds.

BOLLINGER B1

Fledgling EV maker Bollinger Motors is ramping up to launch its first model, the B1 for 2020. It’s a decidedly boxy SUV and it looks a lot like a classic Land Rover. It’s built on an aluminum frame and comes with a dual-motor electric all-wheel-drive system. The B1 promises a 200-mile range with 613 horsepower and a strong 668 pound-feet of torque, and is said to tow as much as 7,500 pounds.

CYBER TRUCK at Tesla Car Store

Cybertruck is built with an exterior shell made for ultimate durability and passenger protection. Starting with a nearly impenetrable exoskeleton, every component is designed for superior strength and endurance, from Ultra-Hard 30X Cold-Rolled stainless-steel structural skin to Tesla armor glass.

Now entering a new class of strength, speed and versatility—only possible with an all-electric design. The powerful drivetrain and low center of gravity provides extraordinary traction control and torque—enabling acceleration from 0-60 mph in as little as 2.9 seconds and up to 500 miles of range.

Tesla Store – Discounts

Comparison between:

  • 2021 Tesla CyberTruck Single Motor RWD
  • 2021 Tesla CyberTruck Dual Motor AWD
  • 2021 Tesla CyberTruck Tri Motor AWD

SPECS*

Tesla CyberTruck Single Motor RWD

  • 0-60 MPH <6.5 SECONDS
  • RANGE: 250+ MILES (EPA EST.)
  • DRIVETRAIN: REAR-WHEEL DRIVE
  • Price: $USD 39900

Tesla CyberTruck Dual Motor AWD

  • 0-60 MPH <4.5 SECONDS
  • RANGE: 300+ MILES (EPA EST.)
  • DRIVETRAIN: DUAL MOTOR ALL-WHEEL DRIVE
  • Price: $USD 49900

Tesla CyberTruck Tri Motor AWD

  • 0-60 MPH <2.9 SECONDS
  • RANGE: 500+ MILES (EPA EST.)
  • DRIVETRAIN TRI MOTOR ALL-WHEEL DRIVE
  • Price: $USD 59900

Pros and Cons of CyberTruck

PROS:

Cybertruck is a vehicle that has better utility than an F-150, while beating out a Porsche 911 in performance.

Cybertruck is designed with 30X Stainless Steel, which is also used on Starship. Cybertruck uses this material for maximum durability, function, and design.

Cybertruck is a beautiful platform for a wildly futuristic design, which contains insane performance, on-road or off-road, regardless.

Cybertruck contains a beautiful full-width unibrow LED bar for a headlight, evident of form, and function packed into one package. With this headlight, maximum visibility is always present, whether at night, or at day with it’s beautiful Always-On LEDs.

With it’s ability to sprint from 0-60 in under 2.9s and be virtually bulletproof, Cybertruck is the best platform for an advanced, beautiful, technological reliant future.

CONS: Cybertruck hurdles. What are the design and production issues that engineers still have to over come?

  1. Crash tests/crumple zone.
  2. Side Mirrors?
  3. Regulatory approval
  4. Stainless steel in salty environments.
  5. Tire size/ range efficiency? Looks cool but….

I realize the shape is actually very efficient to build, ridged and aerodynamic. Looking for feedback.

As a Tesla owner, do you agree that it’s the best car you’ve ever purchased?

Absolutely! But I’m looking forward to an even better one — Cybertruck. I fell in love with that beast the moment I saw it, and put down a reservation as quickly as possible. I find myself near the head of a long, long waiting list for this revolutionary vehicle. I hope to take delivery of a tri-motor within the first 5000 off the assembly line.

Even before seeing it up close and in person, I know it will be the best vehicle I’ll ever purchase. It goes beyond what I love about my Model 3 AWD. I don’t think of it as a pickup truck. I would never buy a traditional pickup for as little as I would use it as such. Cybertruck is an all-in-one vehicle. It’s a pickup truck, sure, but it’s also an SUV that seats six and has 100 cu ft of secure, weather protected storage. I plan to use it for wilderness camping in hard to get to places by virtue of its exemplary off-roading capabilities.

I will happily take my Cybertruck on cross country road trips. The self-driving capabilities of Tesla vehicles make long distance cruising an enjoyable experience, devoid of the typical driving fatigue that I’ve always endured traveling in other cars I’ve owned, even my Class B motor-home, which I recently sold. I’m looking forward to spending time in the back country of Alaska with the grizzlies and the moose (safely tucked inside CT, of course).

Cybertruck will be the most durable vehicle I’ve ever owned, as well. That 3mm cold rolled stainless steel exoskeleton is dent proof, bullet proof, and rust proof. The windows are almost impossible to break, and the rolling tonneau cover is strong enough to support the weight of a 200+ lb man.

Cybertruck comes without paint of any kind which is great for squeezing through brush on abandoned logging roads. No need to hold back to avoid scratching the finish. I may have the truck painted, though, just to give it a personalized touch.

My Cybertruck won’t be left unused. It will be my daily driver. Sure, it’s large, but it won’t be like driving one of those behemoths from Detroit. It’s fast and responsive. The air suspension can be lowered to make it easier to get in and out of, improve handling, and reduce aerodynamic drag.

Add to that its 3500 lbs load capacity, its 14,000 lb towing capacity, 500+ mile range, and fast charging at the ever-expanding Tesla Supercharger network, and it’s easy to understand how this vehicle will be the best, and probably the last, vehicle I’ll ever own. Unless I deploy it to the Tesla Network as a robotaxi in a couple of years. Now there’s a money making idea!

KIA SOUL EV

Kia is redesigning its funky/boxy compact full-electric hatchback for 2020 with fresh styling and myriad improvements. A new 64 kWh liquid-cooled lithium ion polymer battery pack should deliver well in excess of 200 miles on a charge. Power will be bumped up to 200 horsepower with 291 pound-feet of torque. It will come with four drive modes and four levels of regenerative braking, including a setting for one-pedal driving.

MERCEDES-BENZ EQC

The EQC is the first in what will be a series of luxury EVs coming from Mercedes-Benz. It’s a boldly styled SUV with two electric motors that combine for an output of 402 horsepower with 564 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel-drive will be standard, along with a long list of convenience, connectivity, and safety features. In Europe it’s rated to run for 279 miles on a full charge, though that number may be somewhat lower when evaluated by U.S. standards.

MINI ELECTRIC

BMW’s Mini brand is developing a new full-electric version of the comely Cooper coupe, likely for later in 2020. Details, however, remain sketchy. Only scant visual tidbits like this one remain available. Reports say it will share technology with the BMW i3, and could run for as many as 200 miles on a full charge. Expect it to deliver Mini’s famed go-kart-like handling.

POLESTAR 2

Volvo is launching a new high-tech sub-brand this year called Polestar. While its first model, the Polestar 1, will be a plug-in hybrid, the Polestar 2 is a sleekly cast full-electric luxury four-door hatchback. Intended to compete with the Tesla Model 3, the automaker is targeting a range of 275 miles on a charge, with its two electric motors expected to put around a combined 485 pound-feet of torque to the pavement. All-wheel drive will come standard.

PORSCHE TAYCAN

Porsche’s first full-electric model will be an ultra-exotic battery-powered four-door sports car. It’s said to leap off the line and reach 62 mph (100 km/h) in a sudden 3.5 seconds. The automaker claims around 300 miles of range with a full battery, with the ability to recharge about 60 miles worth of energy in just four minutes.

RIVIAN R1T

Yet another startup EV builder, Rivian plans to introduce a futuristic-looking pickup truck for 2020 to be built in the former Mitsubishi factory in Normal, IL. No mere poseur, the R1T is said to deliver a 400-mile range, with its quad-motor system enabling off-road adventures and a 0-60 mph time of just three seconds on paved roads.

TESLA MODEL Y

Expected sometime during 2020, assuming the automaker incurs no production delays or other corporate calamities, the Tesla Model Y will essentially be a crossover SUV version of the Model 3 sedan. Smaller and less expensive than the Model X, it’s sure to become the company’s best selling model. It will initially come in performance, long-range, and dual motor all-wheel drive variants with specs similar to the Model 3.

TESLA ROADSTER

Tesla’s original Roadster was its first model and it broke new ground in terms of performance and operating range. It’s coming back for 2020 with a freshly curvy profile and uncanny performance. Tesla claims it will fly to 60 mph in a rocket-like 1.9 seconds, reach a felonious top speed of 250 mph, and run for a seemingly impossible 620 miles with a full charge.

EV Q&A

1- Does using cruise control when going downhill in an electric car use more energy?

No – quite the opposite in fact.

When going at a constant speed downhill – the car uses regenerative braking to maintain that speed without going faster and faster.

In effect, the electric motor(s) in the car are turned in to generators – and charge up the battery as they go.

Here is an actual screen shot from my Tesla Model 3 – taken shortly after driving over the Franklin Mountains in El Paso…it’s a graph of the energy consumed per mile driven over the last 30 minutes (kinda like the “mpg” number for a gasoline car):

2- How was your Tesla car buying experience? Which Tesla; Model X, Model S, Model 3, or Model Y?

I bought a Model 3 Standard Range Plus with Full-Self-Driving – a little over a year ago.

I went online – did all of the options selection, all of the financing, taxing and insuring in about 40 minutes – and without ever speaking to an actual human. The deposit money was taken from my credit card.

The car was on a 14day delivery back then – but it took a little longer – more like three3 weeks.

During which time, I had to put up with just a model-Model-3:

The full-sized model 3 was delivered on a large covered car transporter – theoretically to my front door – but in fact the driver phoned me to say he couldn’t get through the twisty streets in my neighborhood in his gigantic truck – so we met him in a nearby street. He offloaded the car – gave me time to inspect it – handed me the “credit card” car keys – and that was that. So I drove it the last 100 yards home.

This is by FAR the most pleasant way to buy a car.

SNAFU’S AND MINOR GLITCHES:

There were some SNAFU’s and complications…mostly because I live in Texas where it’s illegal for a car company to sell direct to a customer…this is true in about 50% of US states.

So what happened was that the car was sold to me in Arizona – where it’s legal. The car was delivered by Tesla to their distribution center in Phoenix Arizona – where I actually purchased it. Then Tesla did the work to re-title the car in Texas at their expense.

The car was not shipped in a Tesla transporter but by some 3rd party (whom Tesla also paid).

This complicated little legal dance would not have been noticeable to me EXCEPT that there was some confusion about my insurance. They couldn’t re-title the car to me without it being insured – and I couldn’t insure it without a VIN – and somewhere along the line someone dropped the ball.

So the car arrived with no temporary licence plates and I had to go back to Tesla and have them do that after the insurance SNAFU got ironed out. I’m still not sure whether it was their fault, my fault, my insurance company’s fault – or the DMV here in El Paso’s fault…I’m betting the latter because we’re pretty sure ours was the first Tesla ever sold here.

3- What are some unforeseen impacts of self-driving cars?

Sabotage.

Although companies like Uber and Tesla are not very successful in that aspect, fully self driving cars will have to be able to avoid collisons by all means. They simply will have to be designed in a way that they do not crash against something.

Okay, so what will a self driving car do, when another driver deliberately cuts its lane? What, if some guys make a fun out of throwing garbage cans at self driving cars? What, if some unemployed taxicab drivers try to make a ride in a self-driving taxicab as unpleasant as possible?

This is unlikely? Tell me why people spend extra money in order to make their trucks pollute the air as much as possible:

 
 

CyberTruck will cost half the competition, and here’s why the math says it works

CyberTruck will cost half the competition, and here’s why the math says it works

Sources:

Tesla

MyEV.com

Quora